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Tips To Get Rid Of Moss In The Garden And On The Lawn

Tips To Get Rid Of Moss In The Garden And On The Lawn


By: Heather Rhoades

Moss growing in your lawn or garden can be frustrating if you do not want it there. Killing moss is really a matter of making your lawn an unsuitable place for moss to grow. Let’s look at how to kill moss.

Why Moss Grows in Lawns

The first thing to understand before taking steps for killing moss is that moss is an opportunistic plant. It will not push out grass or kill plants to take hold. It will simply move in to a spot where nothing is growing. Moss in your lawn is normally an indicator that something deeper is wrong with your lawn, and the moss is simply taking advantage of the empty dirt that dead grass left behind. So really, the first step to truly ridding your lawn of moss is to first treat the deeper issue with your lawn.

First, check for the following reasons why your grass may be dying, as these reasons not only kill the grass but create an ideal environment for moss.

  • Compacted soil – soil compaction kills grass roots and creates a smooth area for moss to hold onto.
  • Poor drainage – soil that is continually damp or even swampy will suffocate grass roots and also provide a damp environment that moss loves.
  • Low pH – Grass needs a moderate or slightly alkaline soil to thrive. If your soil has a low pH and is high in acid, it will kill the grass. Coincidentally, moss thrives in high acid soil.
  • Lack of sunlight – Shade is notorious for making it difficult for grass to grow. It is also the preferred light for moss.

How to Kill Moss

Once you have identified and corrected the problem that was causing the grass to die in the first place, you can start the process of killing the moss and replanting the grass.

  1. Start by applying a moss killer to the moss in your lawn. These products normally contain ferrous sulfate or ferrous ammonium sulfate.
  2. Once the moss is dead, rake it off of the area that you want to remove it from.
  3. Seed the area with your desired grass seed.
  4. Keep the seeds moist until the grass has been established again.

Knowing how to kill green moss is not as important as how to have a healthy lawn. Remember, when you kill moss in the lawn, you will only be successful if you take steps to ensure that your lawn is healthy. Without correcting your lawn’s problems, you will only find yourself ridding your lawn of moss again.

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How to Get Rid of Moss in Your Lawn

This article was co-authored by Anthony "TC" Williams. Anthony "TC" Williams is a Professional Landscaper in Idaho. He is the President and Founder of Aqua Conservation Landscape & Irrigation, an Idaho Registered Landscape Business Entity. With over 21 years of landscaping experience, TC has worked on projects such as the Idaho Botanical Garden in Boise, Idaho. He is a Idaho Registered Contractor and a previously Licensed Irrigator in the State of Texas.

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Moss consists of tiny plants that form a habitat for small invertebrates. Most mosses are native and benign, part of a natural succession of vegetation. They cover bare ground and prevent soil erosion. Moss does not kill your grass, but it can creep into your lawn if your grass has already started dying. In order to get rid of it, you will need to use physical and, possibly, chemical methods of removal. In recent years home owners and gardeners have become more interested in encouraging moss because of its beauty and as part of an effort to minimize use of chemicals around the home. A perfect lawn could include some moss, and the world would not come to an end! But if you can't stand the sight of moss in the lawn, then read on.


Mowing too short, too infrequently or not following the correct mowing height for the time of year can be a big contributor to moss growth.

Poor nutrition, weak and gappy grass leaves room for moss to take hold

Shaded lawns with overhanging trees and shrubs are more likely to suffer with moss

Compacted lawns with poor drainage and root development will be more mossy


How to Remove Moss

Last Updated: January 17, 2021 References

This article was co-authored by our trained team of editors and researchers who validated it for accuracy and comprehensiveness. wikiHow's Content Management Team carefully monitors the work from our editorial staff to ensure that each article is backed by trusted research and meets our high quality standards.

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Moss is a type of plant that grows in large clumps or mats, and it can be unsightly if you have it in your yard or on your home. Luckily, there are easy ways that you can get rid of moss from any area with just a few simple tools. If you need to remove moss from a lawn, rake it or use chemicals to kill it before treating your soil. If you have moss growing on bricks, walls, or pavement, you can try scraping it off or cleaning it with a pressure washer. For moss that’s growing on your roof, try to clean off as much as you can before applying cleaning solutions.

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u00a9 2021 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. This image is not licensed under the Creative Commons license applied to text content and some other images posted to the wikiHow website. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.

Warning: Keep children and pets out of the treated area for 2–3 hours since it can be toxic if ingested in large doses.


How to get rid of moss permanently

An investigation is the first key so that you know what’s going on in your soil. A quick soil sample and test can tell you if your lawn is lacking the necessary nutrients for growing a healthy lawn. This is a great way to kill two birds with one stone. It could be soil-related issues and then it could be a lack of nutrients. This is typically an indicator that your soil’s pH is overly acidic. This doesn’t necessarily mean that you need more alkaline soil but the grass might need more alkaline to compete effectively against the moss. Simply apply garden lime to the ground and then fertilize the lawn on a regular basis.

Poor drainage can also invite moss. Check the type of soil and if it’s high in clay, it can gather the moisture in puddles underneath the topsoil causing an imitation of moss. You may need a French drain or some other type of draining system, aerate the lawn and if you see standing water, it’s clear that you have a drainage issue.

Excessive shade may also be an issue. If you have too many trees covering over your lawn, it might be time to trim them back or send them. You might also consider growing a shade-tolerant type of grass.


Watch the video: How to Kill Moss in the Garden