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Aloe elgonica (Mt. Elgon Aloe)

Aloe elgonica (Mt. Elgon Aloe)


Scientific Name

Aloe elgonica Bullock

Common Names

Mt. Elgon Aloe

Scientific Classification

Family: Asphodelaceae
Subfamily: Asphodeloideae
Tribe: Aloeae
Genus: Aloe

Description

Aloe elgonica is an attractive, clump-forming, succulent plant up to 3 feet (90 cm) tall, with up to 1 foot (30 cm) wide rosettes of thick, tight, medium-green, glossy leaves. They are recurved and blushed with a pink color when first emerging and have large broad teeth along the margins. In late spring through mid-summer appear the bright red flowers in upright spikes on a simple or branching inflorescence.

Photo via debraleebaldwin.com

Hardiness

USDA hardiness zone 9b to 11b: from 25 °F (−3.9 °C) to 50 °F (+10 °C).

How to Grow and Care

Aloe is a very forgiving plant, and a well-grown plant can be quite beautiful. As with all succulents, it's essential that Aloe is never allowed to sit in stagnant water, and the plant should be carefully monitored to watch for signs of overwatering.

Aloe are not particularly fast-growing and will only rarely need repotting. Repot plants in the spring that are tipping over their pots or have ceased growing. Use a fast-draining potting mix with one-third sand or pebbles. During repotting of a larger plant, it is possible to carefully divide the root ball. Some kinds of Aloe will send off off-sets that can be potted independently.

It needs strong, bright light. They can withstand full summer sun, once acclimated. In the winter, provide bright light. It prefers warmer temperatures of 70 to 80 °F (21 to 27 °C), but will survive down to 40 °F (4.5 °C). Feed with a cactus fertilizer in the summer only. Suspend feeding in the winter as the plant goes dormant… – See more at: How to Grow and Care for Aloe

Origin

Native to Kenya.

Links

  • Back to genus Aloe
  • Succulentopedia: Browse succulents by Scientific Name, Common Name, Genus, Family, USDA Hardiness Zone, Origin, or cacti by Genus

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Field trip to Poot's Cactus Nursery (part 2)

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In part 1 of this post, I showed you the demonstration garden (including koi pond) and the propagation greenhouse of Poot's Cactus Nursery in Ripon, California.

This post focuses on the sale area. While smaller than the propagation areas, the sale area is jam-packed with goodies. There's an outside area with tables for smaller plants as well as a selection of larger specimens that just sit on the ground. And there's a retail greenhouse with more cold-sensitive and rare specimens, all waiting to be discovered and explored.

I was happy to see that Poot's provides shopping carts and wagons for those of us who take plant shopping seriously. This is Mariel, SCSS vice president and program chair, who organized this field trip and took advantage of this opportunity to buy the raffle plants for the next meeting (Monday, March 27, 7:00 pm for more info, click here).

(Left) Golden barrels in all sizes. (Right) Yucca rostrata with a trunk! Something you almost never see in Northern California. Well priced at $79.

At $29, these Agave titanota in #5 pots were a steal

Another great buy: large Dasylirion longissimum for $69 and $79. Instant impact in your garden!

Agave 'Blue Glow' continues to be the most popular agave out there, judging by the number of plants in the nursery

Something I never see in our neck of the woods: Aloidendron dichotomum with a trunk! Well priced at $69.

Prefer barrel cactus?

Take your pick!

This mystery aloe called out to me from 50 feet away. Simply labeled "Aloe" and bargain-priced at $25, it went home with me (see below).

More fuzzy cactus

Cardons (Pachycereus pringlei) on the left, saguaros (Carnegiea gigantea) on the right

Same plants, different view

Echeveria agavoides in full flower

Large section of cactus babies

One of my favorite cactus, spineless claret cup (Echinocereus triglochidiatus forma inermis), for some reason hard to find

Mammillaria spinosissimum

Mammillaria camptotricha cv. marnier-lapostollei

More saguaros (Carnegiea gigantea)

Your taste runs towards the funky? Poot's has you covered. This is Ibervillea lindheimeri.

Who knows what this is? Well, I'm sure Kitoi knows :-).

Mammillaria parkinsonii

Mammillaria parkinsonii

Instant impact in your garden!

8 ft. pony tail palm trio (Beaucarnea recurvata) for $300. Not cheap, but still a bargain considering the size!


Aloe debrana, a rare aloe from Ethiopia. A steal at $10. One came home with me.

I had never seen crested Pachypodium lamerei before

Truly odd and definitely rare. Priced at $49.

The retail greenhouse is even more exciting that the outside sale area because the plants are in seemingly random order. That makes browsing a veritable treasure hunt. I could have spent hours in there but I was running short on time because our propagation greenhouse tour was scheduled for 10:00 a.m.

Deuterocohnia brevifolia

At $800, it was the most expensive plant by far

The retail greenhouse also contains a small demonstration garden with some interesting plants:

Aloidendron ramosissimum

I think this is Ferocactus platyacanthus

Aloe dorotheae


I have no idea which species of Gasteria this is but it looked great nestled in this burl

And here are my plant purchases from Poot's:
I suspected this was Aloe elgonica, and Brian Kemble, curator of the Ruth Bancroft Garden and my go-to expert for all things aloe, confirmed it. Aloe elgonica grows in only one location, Mt Elgon on the border between Uganda and Kenya (and possibly only on the Kenya side of the mountain).

This is the mystery aloe that called out to me at the nursery. It looked to me like Aloe vaombe, a tree aloe from Madagascar I fell in love with on my recent trip to Southern California and wasn't able to find in the nurseries I visited there.
I didn't dare get my hopes up, but Brian Kemble confirmed that this is indeed Aloe vaombe.

I'm a very, very happy camper.

Aloe debrana, a rare aloe from Ethiopia. It's pretty but not very distinctive, possibly with the exception of its sharp teeth. But look at the flowers it produces!

I also found another plant that had been on my wish list for a long time: Sansevieria trifasciata 'Bantel's Sensation'. It's strictly a houseplant, but it'll be a great addition to the other sansevierias that have taken up residence upstairs.

Considering how far I stray from home at times, Poot's is really quite close. I've vowed not to let another six years go by before my next visit!

And if you have plans to visit Yosemite National Park this year, plan on stopping at Poot's. They're right on Highway 120 just a few miles east of Manteca.

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Comments

Thanks, Keith. I knew you'd come through :-).

So many wonderful things at fabulous prices, I would have had a hard time choosing. Of course with your eye and aloe smarts you did very well!

I wouldn't say smart, but these two aloes were exceptionally attractive and well-priced. You know how much I love a bargain.

I first spotted Poot's while on a school bus, traveling with my 7th graders to a 3-night outing in Yosemite. Couldn't wait to get back to check it out -- what a great find it is! I have a question about the Deuterocohnia brevifolia: how old would you guess that plant is? Is it a fast grower? Speaking of growth, here's an interesting 1960s video about the "Valley of the Sun," featuring (at about 5:00) a visit to the DBG in its early days: http://www.city-data.com/forum/phoenix-area/2423612-1960s-valley-sun-tourism-video.html.

I bet a lot of people catch a glimpse of Poot's in the corner of their eyes as they speed by on Highway 120.

I don't have much experience with Deuterocohnia brevifolia. I have a very small offset (just a few rosettes) and it hasn't done much. I found some info online that suggests that while it's very slow initially, it can pick up speed as it gets old. Apparently, in its native habitat it gets moisture from the occasional fog--and actual water as infrequently as twice a year!

Thank you for sharing that 1960s promo video. What a riot! The plants at the Desert Botanical Garden were SO SMALL! It looks completely different now! I'll watch the rest of the video tonight--it's so cheesy, complete with soothing muzak.

Great finds, Gerhard - your discerning eye serves you well!

In this case, the plants found *me*!

What a fine nursery! And that is a great price for the quiver tree aloe. I have a multi-headed aloe bought as elgonica that has never bloomed, that doesn't have that pinky-purple blush on the leaves that yours has, so now you and Brian have me second-guessing what mine is -- another mystery aloe in my garden!

A few years ago I bought what was labeled "Aloe elgonica" at Lowe's but it looks nothing like the aloe I just got at Poot's. I'm pretty sure now the Lowe's plant was mislabeled. I have no idea what it is, but it's a fairly generic-looking clumper with generic flowers.

Those P. lameri were crestate, which is interesting -- never seen that, but don't see them too often in my travels.

Also, those titanota look like they might be displaying signs of eryophyid mites

Daniel, yikes, agave mites? Are you referring to the bald spots on the leaves were the bloom is gone?

Yeah. It's hard to tell from the photo, so I should emphasize my use of "might be" -- but whenever I see that "wet" splotching in that pattern (whether it is coincident with the active brown lesioning or not) I err on the side of caution and avoid. It is such an unfortunate problem. Getting ready to have to spray in the next few weeks, really hate this issue. a real bummer.

Daniel, I know to look for the brown lesions. What do you spray with? I haven't had any mites on my agaves yet (or aloes!) but it's simply a matter of time.

My understanding from Kent Howser (who I think has compiled the largest body of literature on this issue and freely shares his knowledge) is that there is a sequence of symptomatic presentation: first the wet splotching, then that plus lesioning, then end stage involves leaf and core deformation.

I hate to say it, but I have a large inventory of new miticides including trade names like Oberon, Bifen, Agarifac, etc. They are awful. I've pretty much committed to just growing from seed because it is too easy to bring in an infected plant these days. I have received infected plants from well-regarded nurseries run by people I very much respect. It just is a fact of life these days: if you buy from a nursery, you are rolling the dice

Nice picks! What were the prices on the little 4" plants? I'd love to visit them, need to plan a trip. I must of driven right past it when going that way to Yosemite end of last summer.

Yes, I bet you did drive right past Poot's. It's easy to do.

I bought a 4" Astrophytum, and it was $5. I assume the other 4" plants were in the same range ($4 to $6), depending on rarity. That spineless claret cup I'm so fond of was $5.50, I believe.

Larger plants were an even better value, especially considering what a headstart you get with, say, a 5 gallon plant.

I'd go totally nuts. Congrats on your great finds! Those Ferocactus glaucescens look very nice, and are much more nicely priced than I would have imagined. Checking my calendar and daydreaming now.

The larger plants, in particular, were very reasonably priced. Better prices than in Southern California!

Aloe debrana has striking flowers--wonder if it's a genetic contributor to Aloe 'Erik the Red'. Great find. What a great place--it must have been a fun field trip. Their koi pond is pretty nice, too.

We got to feed the koi! Those are some happy and well-fed fish!

The exact parentage of 'Erik the Red' is kept a secret, but it's thought to have A. mawii, petricola, marlothii and arborescens in it (see http://www.smgrowers.com/products/plants/plantdisplay.asp?plant_id=3734).

Can't wait for A. debrana to flower. I may need to protect it in the winter. San Marcos Growers says it's hardiness is "not well documented."

OMIGOSH that Deuterocohnia brevifolia!

I admire your restraint. Could easily go bankrupt indulging your passion in all the 'eye candy'!

Believe me, the only thing reigning me in is the lack of planting space in the garden. Otherwise I would have had two shopping carts.

You got an Aloe vaombe. I'm so jealous, Gerhard. I'm way behind on my reading so I missed this posting last month. It looks beautiful.

YESSSSSSS. I'm still so thrilled about that. $25 for such a large plant! Since it's cold-sensitive, I will eventually plant it near the front door where the Yucca 'Margaritaville' is now. For now it'll live in a large pot.


Landscaping Water Wise

Our late 2011 move to a beautiful, albeit neglected, 1.7 acre Southern California property was an eye-opener on water and waste. Five dry years and multiple landscaping redos later, our zone 10 gardens can now be described as sustainable and lush with a touch of whimsy.

Current plants thriving in my garden – in spite of less than half this dry climate’s normal rainfall these past five years and less than half the irrigation used before rationing began three years ago – are listed alphabetically by type below. Plants that failed for one reason or another and have been removed are grouped at the bottom of this post. LAST UPDATED 1/26/17

“The garden that is finished is dead.” — H. E. Bates

  • Aeonium ‘Berry Nice’
  • Aeonium ‘Blushing Beauty’ – Blushing Aeonium
  • Aeonium ciliatum
  • Aeonium ‘Lily Pad’
  • Aeonium ‘Mint Saucer’ – Green Aeonium
  • Aeonium ‘Plum Purdy’ – Plum Purdy Aeonium
  • Aeonium ‘Pseudotabuliforme’ – Green Platters
  • Aeonium Sunspot
  • Agave attenuata Kara’s Stripe
  • Agave attenuata Nova
  • Agave attenuatta ‘Ray of Light’
  • Agave Blue Flame
  • Agave ‘Blue Glow’
  • Agave bovicornuta ‘Reggae Time”
  • Agave bracteosa ‘Monterrey Frost’ – Frosted Candelabrum Agave
  • Agave ‘Cornelius’ – Quasimoto Agave
  • Agave ferdinandi-regis – King of the Agaves
  • Agave franzosinii
  • Agave gracielae – Slender-leaved Agave
  • Agave isthmensis – Dwarf Butterfly Agave
  • Agave lophantha ‘Quadricolor’ – Quadricolor Century Plant
  • Agave macroacantha ‘Pablo’s Choice’ – Small Black-spined Agave
  • Agave nizandensis – Nizanda Agave
  • Agave ovatifolia ‘Frosty Blue’ – Whale’s Tongue Agave
  • Agave potatorum ‘El Camarón’ – El Camarón Butterfly Agave
  • Agave potatorum ‘Cherry Swizzle’ – Cherry Swizzle Butterfly Agave
  • Agave striata forma purpurea – Purple Maguey Espadín
  • Agave ‘Snow Glow’
  • Agave victoriae-reginae – Queen Victoria Agave
  • Agave victoriae-reginae ‘Compacta’
  • Aloe brevifolia – Short-leaved Aloe
  • Agave parrasana ‘Fireball’
  • Agave potatorum ‘Kichiokan Marginata’ – Dwarf Variegated Butterfly Agave
  • Agave pumila – Miniature Agave
  • Agave schidigera ‘Shira ito no Ohi’ – Queen of White Thread-leaf Agave
  • Agave ‘Snow Glow’
  • Agave tequilana ‘Sunrise’ – Sunrise Tequila Agave
  • Agave weberi ‘Arizona Star’ – Variegated Weber Agave
  • Aloe acutissima – Blue Aloe
  • Aloe arborescens ‘Variegata’ – variegated candelabra aloe
  • Aloe brevifolia – Short-leaved Aloe – Watch Chain/ Princess Pine
  • Aloe cameronii – red Aloe
  • Aloe chabaudii ‘Orange Burst’ – Dwala Aloe
  • Aloe ‘Coral Fire’
  • Aloe deltoideodonta
  • Aloe distans – Jeweled Aloe
  • Aloe dorothea
  • Aloe elgonica – Mt. Elgon Aloe
  • Aloe greenii
  • Aloe Hercules
  • Aloe lolwensis – Lake Victoria Aloe
  • Aloe Marlothii
  • Aloe nobilis – Gold Tooth Aloe
  • Aloe nobilis ‘Variegata’ – Variegated Gold Tooth Aloe
  • Aloe pluridens – French Aloe
  • Aloe reitzii – Reitz’s Aloe
  • Aloe rubroviolacea
  • Aloe schelpei – Shelpe’s Aloe
  • Aloe speciosa – Tilt-head Aloe
  • Aloe x spinosissima – Spider Aloe
  • Aloe ‘Tropic World’
  • Aloe vaombe – Malagasy Tree Aloe
  • Aloe variegata – Partridge Breast Aloe
  • Aloe ‘Verity Nice’
  • Aloe wickensii – Geelaalwyn
  • Beaucarnea recurvata – Bottle Palm
  • Beschorneria albiflora – Trunking Beschorneria
  • Cephalocereus senilis – Old Man Cactus
  • Cereus forbesii ‘Spiralis’
  • Cereus peruvianus “Monstrosus” – monstrose apple cactus
  • Cleistocactus strausii – Silver Torch aka Snow Pole Cactus
  • Crassula arborescens ssp. undulatifolia ‘Blue Bird’
  • Crassula arborescens subsp. Undulatifolia – ‘Blue Wave’
  • Crassula lycopodioides aka muscosa
  • Crassula muscosa Variegata
  • Cylindropuntia sp.
  • Crassula Perforata Variegata – Variegated Necklace Vine
  • Dasylirion wheeleri
  • Deuterocohnia brevifolia
  • Deuterocohnia lorentziana – Abromeitiella
  • Dudleya brittonii
  • Echeveria agavoides ‘Ebony’
  • Echeveria agavoides ‘Lipstick’
  • Echeveria agavoides “Corderoyi” crest
  • Echeveria agavoides ‘Prolifera’ – Carpet Echeveria
  • Echeveria ‘Blue Dude’
  • Echeveria Cante
  • Echeveria ‘Dondo’
  • Echeveria elegans – Mexican Snowball
  • Echeveria Gary’s bronze crested
  • Echeveria gigantea
  • Echeveria imbricata – Blue Rose echeveria
  • Echeveria ‘Lady Aquarius’
  • Echeveria lutea
  • Echeveria ‘Mahagony Rose’
  • Echeveria nodulosa – Painted Echeveria
  • Echinocactus grusonii – Golden barrel cactus
  • Echinopsis pachanoi (syn. Trichocereus pachanoi) —San Pedro cactus
  • Encephalartos lehmannii – Karoo Cycad
  • Espostoa lanata
  • Euphorbia Ammak “variegata” – aka Euphorbia erythraea forma variegate
  • Euphorbia sp. from Huntington
  • Euphorbia hypericifolia Diamond Frost
  • Euphorbia ingens monstrose
  • Euphorbia leucodendron – Cat Tails Euphorbia
  • Euphorbia mammillaris forma variegata
  • Euphorbia pillansii
  • Euphorbia resinifera – Moroccan Mound
  • Euphorbia trigona f. “Rubra”
  • Euphorbia tirucalli ‘Sticks on Fire’ – Red Pencil Tree
  • Ferocactus gracilis colorato or acanthodes
  • Furcraea macdougallii – Macdougall’s Furcraea
  • Gasteria bicolor
  • Graptopetalum paraguayense
  • Graptopetalum paraguayense ‘Pinky’
  • Graptopetalum pentandrum – Five Stamen Graptopetalum
  • Graptopetalum ‘Vera Higgins’
  • Graptoveria ‘Fred Ives’
  • Kalanchoe beharensis – Velvet Elephant Ear
  • Kalanchoe grandiflora – Yellow Kalanchoe
  • Pachyphytum ‘Bill Baker’
  • Hesperaloe parviflora – Red hesperaloe
  • Mammarillia #1
  • Mammarillia #2
  • Mammarillia #3
  • Myrtillocactus geometrizans crest
  • Pachycereus schottii f. monstrosus – Totem Pole Cactus
  • Pedilanthus bracteatus – Tall Slipper plant
  • Pilosocereus pachycladus
  • Portulacaria afra – Elephant’s Food
  • Senecio anteuphorbium – Swizzle Sticks
  • Senecio cylindricus – Narrow-Leaf Chalksticks aka Senecio Vitalis
  • Senecio mandralisceae
  • Senecio serpens – ‘Mini Blue Chalksticks’
  • Yucca desmetiana ‘Blue Boy’ – Yucca aloifolia ‘Purpurea’
  • Yucca Linearifolia
  • Yucca Rostrata ‘Sapphire Skies”

“A garden is never so good as it will be next year.” — Thomas Cooper

  • Acacia cognata ‘Cousin Itt’
  • Acacia iteaphylla – Willow Wattle
  • Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’ – Wormwood
  • Baccharis pilularis ‘Pigeon Point’ – Dwarf Coyote Brush
  • Callistemon ‘Jeffers’ – Purple Bottlebrush
  • Ceanothus ‘Ray Hartmann’
  • Ceanothus Yankee Point
  • Coleonema pulchellum ‘Sunset Gold’ – Golden Breath of Heaven
  • Coprosma kirkii ‘Variegata’
  • Coprosma repens ‘Marble Queen’ – Dwarf Variegated Mirror Plant
  • Coprosma repens ‘Plum Hussey’ – Plum Hussey Mirror Plant
  • Euphorbia cotinifolia – Caribbean Copper Plant
  • Helichrysum petiolare – Licorice Plant
  • Hydrangea quercifoliam ‘Snow Queen’ – oakleaf hydrangea
  • Lavandula ‘Goodwin Creek Grey’ – Goodwin Creek Lavender
  • Ligustrum japonicum – Japanese Privet
  • Leucophyta brownie – Cushion Bush
  • Melianthus major – Honey Bush
  • Myoporum parvifolium ‘Fine Leaf Form’ – Fine-leaf Groundcover Myoporum
  • Myoporum parvifolium white
  • Ozothamnus ‘Sussex Silver’
  • Pisonia umbellifera ‘Variegata’ – Map Plant
  • Pittosporum tenuifolium ‘Marjorie Channon’ – Variegated Kohuhu
  • Pittosporum tobira ‘Variegata’ – Mock Orange
  • Pittosporum undulatum – Victorian Box
  • Plumbago auriculata ‘Imperial Blue’ – Blue Cape Plumbago
  • Rhaphiolepis umbellata ‘Minor’ – Dwarf Yeddo Hawthorn
  • Rhagodia spinescens – Creeping Australian Saltbush
  • Rosa ‘Iceberg’ – White Shrub Rose
  • Rosmarinus officinalis ‘Boule’
  • Rosmarinus officinalis ‘Tuscan Blue’ – Upright Rosemary
  • Rosmarinus prostrata
  • Salvia leucantha ‘Midnight’ – Purple Mexican Sage
  • Tibouchina heteromalla – Silver leafed Princess Flower
  • Westringia ‘Wynyabbie Gem’ – Coast Rosemary
  • Westringia ‘smokey’

“Earth laughs in flowers.” — Ralph Waldo Emerson

  • Agapanthus praecox orientalis Queen Mum – Lily of the Nile
  • Asparagus densiflorus ‘Myers’ – Foxtail Fern
  • Clivia cyrtanthiflora
  • Neomarica caerulea – Walking Iris
  • Phormium ‘Guardsman’ – Guardsman New Zealand Flax
  • Phormium ‘Wildwood’ – Berkeley Purple Flax
  • Plectranthus argentatus – Silver Plectranthus
  • Plectranthus Blue Yonder – Blue Spire Plectranthus
  • Plectranthus ciliatus ‘Dredge’ – Spur Flower
  • Strelitzia reginae – Bird of Paradise
  • Teucreum charmaedrys
  • Tradescantia ‘Greenlee’ – Pale Puma Spiderwort

“God almighty first planted a garden. And indeed, it is the purest of human pleasures.” – Francis Bacon

  • Acacia baileyana ‘Purpurea’ – Purple Fernleaf Acacia
  • Acer palmatum ‘Bloodgood’
  • Agonis flexuosa ‘Jervis Bay Afterdark’ – After Dark Peppermint Tree
  • Arbutus ‘Marina’ (Low branched) – Marina Strawberry Tree
  • Arbutus ‘Marina’ (Standard) – Marina Strawberry Tree
  • Chamaerops humilis var. argentea
  • Cordyline banksii Electric Pink [‘Sprilecpink’] – Electric Pink Grass Tree
  • Cordyline banksii Electric Star – Electric Star Grass Tree
  • Cupressus cashmeriana – Kashmir Cypress
  • Eureka lemon
  • Jacaranda mimosifolia (Standard) – Jacaranda
  • Magnolia grandiflora ‘Little Gem’
  • Olea africana – African olive
  • Olea europaea ‘Fruitless’ – Fruitless Olive
  • Olea europaea ‘Wilsonii’
  • Quercus agrifolia ‘Coast Live Oak’

“No occupation is so delightful to me as the culture of the earth, and no culture comparable to that of the garden.” — Thomas Jefferson

  • Bauhinia Yunnanensis – Climbing orchid vine
  • Bougainvillea ‘Orange King’
  • Clematis armandii – Evergreen Clematis
  • Jasminum angulare – South African Jasmine
  • Pandorea jasminoides ‘Alba’ – White Bower Vine
  • Rhoicissus capensis – Evergreen Grape
  • Rosa ‘Royal Sunset’
  • Thunbergia grandiflora – Blue Sky Flower

“To plant a garden is to believe in tomorrow.” — Audrey Hepburn

  • Chondropetalum tectorum
  • Cordyline Design-a-line Burgundy
  • Dianella tasmanica ‘Variegata’ – White Striped Tasman Flax Lily
  • Miscanthus transmorrisonensis – Evergreen Eulalia

“A gardener learns more in the mistakes than the successes.”– Barbara Doyle Borland

TRIED & FAILED (died, struggled, were unappealing, or took too much water for the effect)

  • Acer palmate ‘Sango Kaku’
  • Adenanthos sericeus – Coastal Woollybush
  • Aeonium Zwartkop
  • Agapanthus ‘Getty White’
  • Agapanthus ‘Tinkerbell’ – Dwarf Variegated Agapanthus
  • Agave celesii
  • Agave ‘Crème Brulee’
  • Agave salmiana ‘Green Giant’ – Giant Agave
  • Agave ‘Joe Hoak’
  • Agave weberi – Weber Agave
  • Aloe ‘Jenny Lind’
  • Aloe maculata ‘Jack-O-Lantern’ – Orange Soap Aloe
  • Aloe ‘Moonglow’
  • Aloe plicatilis (Fan Aloe)
  • Aloe striata – Coral Aloe
  • Alyogyne huegelii ‘Santa Cruz’ – Blue Hibiscus
  • Arcotis ‘Magenta”
  • Arctostaphlos ‘Sunset’
  • Beschornia yuccioides – Mexican Lily
  • Bougainvillea ‘Rosenka’
  • Calothamns villousus
  • Camellia ‘Silver Wave’
  • Campanula gold
  • Carex glauca
  • Ceonthus ‘Dark Star’
  • Ceanothus griseus horizontalis ‘Diamond Heights’ – Carmel Creeper
  • Ceonythus ‘Snow Flurry’
  • Cercis Canadensis – Red Bud
  • Citsus Sunset
  • Convolvulus sabatius
  • Coprosma ‘Fireburst’
  • Coprosma ‘Inferno
  • Correa ‘Ivory Bells’ – White Australian Fuchsia
  • Crassula capitella ‘Campfire’ – Campfire Crassula
  • Crassula corymbulosa
  • Cyrtomium falcatum – Japanese holly fern
  • Dianella caerulea King Alfred – Blue Flax Lily
  • Dichondra Silver Falls
  • Dondonea ‘Purpurea’
  • Echium fastuosum
  • Echium wilpretii
  • Echeveria Fire & Ice
  • Elaeagnus pungens ‘Variegata’ – Variegated Autumn Olive
  • Erodium
  • Escallonia ‘Iveyi’
  • Euphorbia clandestina – Volstruisnek
  • Euphorbia myrsinites
  • Grevillea ‘Austraflora Fanfare’
  • Grevillea nudiflora ‘Medusa’
  • Heuchera ‘Crimson Curls’
  • Helichrysum petiolare ‘Limelight’ – Limelight Licorice Plant
  • Helictotrichon sempervirens – Blue Oat grass
  • Kalanchoe pumila – Flower Dust Plant
  • Kniphofia
  • Lavender Otto Quast
  • Lavendula heterophylla
  • Loropetalum chinense ‘ Plum Delight’
  • Loropetalum chinense ‘Purple Majesty’
  • Mangave ‘macho macho’
  • Metrosideros excelsa – New Zealand Christmas Tree
  • Myrsine Africana – African Boxwood
  • Nandina domestica ‘Gulf Stream’
  • Nepata Fassenii ‘Walker’s Low’
  • Phlebodium aureum – Rabbit’s Foot Fern
  • Phormium ‘Pink Stripe’
  • Pittosporum crassifolium – Karo
  • Pittosporum ‘Silver Sheen’
  • Plecostachys serpyllifolia – Cobweb Bush
  • Portulacaria afra ‘Prostrate Form Variegata’ – Dwarf Elephant Food
  • Polygala x dalmaisiana – Sweet Pea Shrub
  • Prostanthera ovalifolia ‘Variegata’ – Variegated Mint Bush
  • Pultenea
  • Rosa ‘Polka’
  • Sarcococca – sweet box
  • Scaeveola ‘Mini’
  • Senecio haworthii – Woolly Senecio
  • Sedum rupestre ‘Angelina’ – Golden Sedum
  • Sedum blue spruce
  • Senecio crassissimus – Vertical Leaf Senecio
  • Senecio jacobsenii – Trailing Jade
  • Silene uniflora ‘Variegated’
  • Sollya heterophylla – Australian Bluebell Creeper
  • Strobilanthes gossypinus – Persian shield
  • Tagates
  • Tradescantia pallida ‘Purple Heart’ – Purple Spiderwort
  • Westringia fruticosa ‘Morning Light’

“A garden is a grand teacher. It teaches patience and careful watchfulness it teaches industry and thrift above all, it teaches entire trust.” — Gertrude Jekyll


Our late 2011 move to a beautiful, albeit neglected, 1.7 acre Southern California property was an eye-opener on water and waste. Five years of drought, 3 years of rationing, and multiple redos later, our 1-acre zone 10 gardens can now be described as sustainable and lush with a touch of whimsy.

Thriving plants after this 5-year transformation from water intensive to water wise are alphabetized by type below. Others that failed and were removed are at the bottom. (List current as of 2/11/17)

“The garden that is finished is dead.” — H. E. Bates

  • Aeonium ‘Berry Nice’
  • Aeonium ‘Blushing Beauty’ – Blushing Aeonium
  • Aeonium ciliatum
  • Aeonium ‘Lily Pad’
  • Aeonium ‘Mint Saucer’ – Green Aeonium
  • Aeonium ‘Plum Purdy’ – Plum Purdy Aeonium
  • Aeonium ‘Pseudotabuliforme’ – Green Platters
  • Aeonium Sunspot
  • Agave attenuata Kara’s Stripe
  • Agave attenuata Nova
  • Agave attenuatta ‘Ray of Light’
  • Agave Blue Flame
  • Agave ‘Blue Glow’
  • Agave bovicornuta ‘Reggae Time”
  • Agave bracteosa ‘Monterrey Frost’ – Frosted Candelabrum Agave
  • Agave ‘Cornelius’ – Quasimoto Agave
  • Agave ferdinandi-regis – King of the Agaves
  • Agave franzosinii
  • Agave gracielae – Slender-leaved Agave
  • Agave isthmensis – Dwarf Butterfly Agave
  • Agave lophantha ‘Quadricolor’ – Quadricolor Century Plant
  • Agave macroacantha ‘Pablo’s Choice’ – Small Black-spined Agave
  • Agave nizandensis – Nizanda Agave
  • Agave ovatifolia ‘Frosty Blue’ – Whale’s Tongue Agave
  • Agave parrasana ‘Fireball’
  • Agave potatorum ‘El Camarón’ – El Camarón Butterfly Agave
  • Agave potatorum ‘Cherry Swizzle’ – Cherry Swizzle Butterfly Agave
  • Agave potatorum ‘Kichiokan Marginata’ – Dwarf Variegated Butterfly Agave
  • Agave pumila – Miniature Agave
  • Agave schidigera ‘Shira ito no Ohi’ – Queen of White Thread-leaf Agave
  • Agave ‘Snow Glow’
  • Agave striata forma purpurea – Purple Maguey Espadín
  • Agave ‘Sun Glow’
  • Agave tequilana ‘Sunrise’ – Sunrise Tequila Agave
  • Agave victoriae-reginae – Queen Victoria Agave
  • Agave victoriae-reginae ‘Compacta’
  • Agave weberi ‘Arizona Star’ – Variegated Weber Agave
  • Aloe acutissima – Blue Aloe
  • Aloe arborescens ‘Variegata’ – variegated candelabra aloe
  • Aloe brevifolia – Short-leaved Aloe – Watch Chain/ Princess Pine
  • Aloe cameronii – red Aloe
  • Aloe chabaudii ‘Orange Burst’ – Dwala Aloe
  • Aloe ‘Coral Fire’
  • Aloe deltoideodonta
  • Aloe distans – Jeweled Aloe
  • Aloe dorothea
  • Aloe elgonica – Mt. Elgon Aloe
  • Aloe greenii
  • Aloe Hercules
  • Aloe lolwensis – Lake Victoria Aloe
  • Aloe Marlothii
  • Aloe nobilis – Gold Tooth Aloe
  • Aloe nobilis ‘Variegata’ – Variegated Gold Tooth Aloe
  • Aloe pluridens – French Aloe
  • Aloe reitzii – Reitz’s Aloe
  • Aloe rubroviolacea
  • Aloe schelpei – Shelpe’s Aloe
  • Aloe speciosa – Tilt-head Aloe
  • Aloe x spinosissima – Spider Aloe
  • Aloe ‘Tropic World’
  • Aloe vaombe – Malagasy Tree Aloe
  • Aloe variegata – Partridge Breast Aloe
  • Aloe ‘Verity Nice’
  • Aloe wickensii – Geelaalwyn
  • Beaucarnea recurvata – Bottle Palm
  • Beschorneria albiflora – Trunking Beschorneria
  • Cephalocereus senilis – Old Man Cactus
  • Cereus forbesii ‘Spiralis’
  • Cereus peruvianus “Monstrosus” – monstrose apple cactus
  • Cleistocactus strausii – Silver Torch aka Snow Pole Cactus
  • Crassula arborescens ssp. undulatifolia ‘Blue Bird’
  • Crassula arborescens subsp. Undulatifolia – ‘Blue Wave’
  • Crassula lycopodioides aka muscosa
  • Crassula muscosa Variegata
  • Crassula Perforata Variegata – Variegated Necklace Vine
  • Cylindropuntia sp.
  • Dasylirion wheeleri
  • Deuterocohnia brevifolia
  • Deuterocohnia lorentziana – Abromeitiella
  • Dudleya brittonii
  • Echeveria agavoides ‘Ebony’
  • Echeveria agavoides ‘Lipstick’
  • Echeveria agavoides “Corderoyi” crest
  • Echeveria agavoides ‘Prolifera’ – Carpet Echeveria
  • Echeveria ‘Blue Dude’
  • Echeveria Cante
  • Echeveria ‘Dondo’
  • Echeveria elegans – Mexican Snowball
  • Echeveria Gary’s bronze crested
  • Echeveria gigantea
  • Echeveria imbricata – Blue Rose echeveria
  • Echeveria ‘Lady Aquarius’
  • Echeveria lutea
  • Echeveria ‘Mahagony Rose’
  • Echeveria nodulosa – Painted Echeveria
  • Echinocactus grusonii – Golden barrel cactus
  • Echinopsis pachanoi (syn. Trichocereus pachanoi) —San Pedro cactus
  • Encephalartos lehmannii – Karoo Cycad
  • Espostoa lanata
  • Euphorbia Ammak “variegata” – aka Euphorbia erythraea forma variegate
  • Euphorbia flanaganii
  • Euphorbia flanaganii crest
  • Euphorbia hypericifolia Diamond Frost
  • Euphorbia ingens monstrose
  • Euphorbia leucodendron – Cat Tails Euphorbia
  • Euphorbia mammillaris forma variegata
  • Euphorbia pillansii
  • Euphorbia resinifera – Moroccan Mound
  • Euphorbia sp. from Huntington
  • Euphorbia trigona f. “Rubra”
  • Euphorbia tirucalli ‘Sticks on Fire’ – Red Pencil Tree
  • Ferocactus gracilis colorato or acanthodes
  • Furcraea macdougallii – Macdougall’s Furcraea
  • Gasteria bicolor
  • Graptopetalum paraguayense
  • Graptopetalum paraguayense ‘Pinky’
  • Graptopetalum pentandrum – Five Stamen Graptopetalum
  • Graptopetalum ‘Vera Higgins’
  • Graptoveria ‘Fred Ives’
  • Hesperaloe parviflora – Red hesperaloe
  • Kalanchoe beharensis – Velvet Elephant Ear
  • Kalanchoe grandiflora – Yellow Kalanchoe
  • Mammarillia #1
  • Mammarillia #2
  • Mammarillia #3
  • Myrtillocactus geometrizans crest
  • Pachycereus schottii f. monstrosus – Totem Pole Cactus
  • Pedilanthus bracteatus – Tall Slipper plant
  • Pilosocereus pachycladus
  • Portulacaria afra – Elephant’s Food
  • Senecio anteuphorbium – Swizzle Sticks
  • Senecio cylindricus – Narrow-Leaf Chalksticks aka Senecio Vitalis
  • Senecio mandralisceae
  • Senecio serpens – ‘Mini Blue Chalksticks’
  • Yucca desmetiana ‘Blue Boy’ – Yucca aloifolia ‘Purpurea’
  • Yucca Linearifolia
  • Yucca Rostrata ‘Sapphire Skies”

“A garden is never so good as it will be next year.” — Thomas Cooper

  • Acacia cognata ‘Cousin Itt’
  • Acacia iteaphylla – Willow Wattle
  • Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’ – Wormwood
  • Baccharis pilularis ‘Pigeon Point’ – Dwarf Coyote Brush
  • Callistemon ‘Jeffers’ – Purple Bottlebrush
  • Ceanothus ‘Ray Hartmann’
  • Ceanothus Yankee Point
  • Coleonema pulchellum ‘Sunset Gold’ – Golden Breath of Heaven
  • Coprosma kirkii ‘Variegata’
  • Coprosma repens ‘Marble Queen’ – Dwarf Variegated Mirror Plant
  • Coprosma repens ‘Plum Hussey’ – Plum Hussey Mirror Plant
  • Euphorbia cotinifolia – Caribbean Copper Plant
  • Helichrysum petiolare – Licorice Plant
  • Hydrangea quercifoliam ‘Snow Queen’ – oakleaf hydrangea
  • Lavandula ‘Goodwin Creek Grey’ – Goodwin Creek Lavender
  • Ligustrum japonicum – Japanese Privet
  • Leucophyta brownie – Cushion Bush
  • Melianthus major – Honey Bush
  • Myoporum parvifolium ‘Fine Leaf Form’ – Fine-leaf Groundcover Myoporum
  • Myoporum parvifolium white
  • Ozothamnus ‘Sussex Silver’
  • Pisonia umbellifera ‘Variegata’ – Map Plant
  • Pittosporum tenuifolium ‘Marjorie Channon’ – Variegated Kohuhu
  • Pittosporum tobira ‘Variegata’ – Mock Orange
  • Pittosporum undulatum – Victorian Box
  • Plumbago auriculata ‘Imperial Blue’ – Blue Cape Plumbago
  • Rhaphiolepis umbellata ‘Minor’ – Dwarf Yeddo Hawthorn
  • Rhagodia spinescens – Creeping Australian Saltbush
  • Rosa ‘Iceberg’ – White Shrub Rose
  • Rosmarinus officinalis ‘Boule’
  • Rosmarinus officinalis ‘Tuscan Blue’ – Upright Rosemary
  • Rosmarinus prostrata
  • Salvia leucantha ‘Midnight’ – Purple Mexican Sage
  • Tibouchina heteromalla – Silver leafed Princess Flower
  • Westringia ‘Wynyabbie Gem’ – Coast Rosemary
  • Westringia ‘smokey’

“Earth laughs in flowers.” — Ralph Waldo Emerson

  • Agapanthus praecox orientalis Queen Mum – Lily of the Nile
  • Asparagus densiflorus ‘Myers’ – Foxtail Fern
  • Clivia cyrtanthiflora
  • Neomarica caerulea – Walking Iris
  • Phormium ‘Guardsman’ – Guardsman New Zealand Flax
  • Phormium ‘Wildwood’ – Berkeley Purple Flax
  • Plectranthus argentatus – Silver Plectranthus
  • Plectranthus Blue Yonder – Blue Spire Plectranthus
  • Plectranthus ciliatus ‘Dredge’ – Spur Flower
  • Strelitzia reginae – Bird of Paradise
  • Teucreum charmaedrys
  • Tradescantia ‘Greenlee’ – Pale Puma Spiderwort

“God almighty first planted a garden. And indeed, it is the purest of human pleasures.” – Francis Bacon

  • Acacia baileyana ‘Purpurea’ – Purple Fernleaf Acacia
  • Acer palmatum ‘Bloodgood’
  • Agonis flexuosa ‘Jervis Bay Afterdark’ – After Dark Peppermint Tree
  • Arbutus ‘Marina’ (Low branched) – Marina Strawberry Tree
  • Arbutus ‘Marina’ (Standard) – Marina Strawberry Tree
  • Chamaerops humilis var. argentea
  • Cordyline banksii Electric Pink [‘Sprilecpink’] – Electric Pink Grass Tree
  • Cordyline banksii Electric Star – Electric Star Grass Tree
  • Cupressus cashmeriana – Kashmir Cypress
  • Eureka lemon
  • Jacaranda mimosifolia (Standard) – Jacaranda
  • Magnolia grandiflora ‘Little Gem’
  • Olea africana – African olive
  • Olea europaea ‘Fruitless’ – Fruitless Olive
  • Olea europaea ‘Wilsonii’
  • Quercus agrifolia ‘Coast Live Oak’

“No occupation is so delightful to me as the culture of the earth, and no culture comparable to that of the garden.” — Thomas Jefferson

  • Bauhinia Yunnanensis – Climbing orchid vine
  • Bougainvillea ‘Orange King’
  • Clematis armandii – Evergreen Clematis
  • Jasminum angulare – South African Jasmine
  • Pandorea jasminoides ‘Alba’ – White Bower Vine
  • Rhoicissus capensis – Evergreen Grape
  • Rosa ‘Royal Sunset’
  • Thunbergia grandiflora – Blue Sky Flower

“To plant a garden is to believe in tomorrow.” — Audrey Hepburn

  • Chondropetalum tectorum
  • Cordyline Design-a-line Burgundy
  • Dianella tasmanica ‘Variegata’ – White Striped Tasman Flax Lily
  • Miscanthus transmorrisonensis – Evergreen Eulalia

“A gardener learns more in the mistakes than the successes.”– Barbara Doyle Borland

TRIED & FAILED (died, struggled, were unappealing, or took too much water for the effect)

  • Acer palmate ‘Sango Kaku’
  • Adenanthos sericeus – Coastal Woollybush
  • Aeonium Zwartkop
  • Agapanthus ‘Getty White’
  • Agapanthus ‘Tinkerbell’ – Dwarf Variegated Agapanthus
  • Agave celesii
  • Agave ‘Crème Brulee’
  • Agave salmiana ‘Green Giant’ – Giant Agave
  • Agave ‘Joe Hoak’
  • Agave weberi – Weber Agave
  • Aloe ‘Jenny Lind’
  • Aloe maculata ‘Jack-O-Lantern’ – Orange Soap Aloe
  • Aloe ‘Moonglow’
  • Aloe plicatilis (Fan Aloe)
  • Aloe striata – Coral Aloe
  • Alyogyne huegelii ‘Santa Cruz’ – Blue Hibiscus
  • Arcotis ‘Magenta”
  • Arctostaphlos ‘Sunset’
  • Beschornia yuccioides – Mexican Lily
  • Bougainvillea ‘Rosenka’
  • Calothamns villousus
  • Camellia ‘Silver Wave’
  • Campanula gold
  • Carex glauca
  • Ceonthus ‘Dark Star’
  • Ceanothus griseus horizontalis ‘Diamond Heights’ – Carmel Creeper
  • Ceonythus ‘Snow Flurry’
  • Cercis Canadensis – Red Bud
  • Citsus Sunset
  • Convolvulus sabatius
  • Coprosma ‘Fireburst’
  • Coprosma ‘Inferno
  • Correa ‘Ivory Bells’ – White Australian Fuchsia
  • Crassula capitella ‘Campfire’ – Campfire Crassula
  • Crassula corymbulosa
  • Cyrtomium falcatum – Japanese holly fern
  • Dianella caerulea King Alfred – Blue Flax Lily
  • Dichondra Silver Falls
  • Dondonea ‘Purpurea’
  • Echium fastuosum
  • Echium wilpretii
  • Echeveria Fire & Ice
  • Elaeagnus pungens ‘Variegata’ – Variegated Autumn Olive
  • Erodium
  • Escallonia ‘Iveyi’
  • Euphorbia clandestina – Volstruisnek
  • Euphorbia myrsinites
  • Grevillea ‘Austraflora Fanfare’
  • Grevillea nudiflora ‘Medusa’
  • Heuchera ‘Crimson Curls’
  • Helichrysum petiolare ‘Limelight’ – Limelight Licorice Plant
  • Helictotrichon sempervirens – Blue Oat grass
  • Kalanchoe pumila – Flower Dust Plant
  • Kniphofia
  • Lavender Otto Quast
  • Lavendula heterophylla
  • Loropetalum chinense ‘ Plum Delight’
  • Loropetalum chinense ‘Purple Majesty’
  • Mangave ‘macho macho’
  • Metrosideros excelsa – New Zealand Christmas Tree
  • Myrsine Africana – African Boxwood
  • Nandina domestica ‘Gulf Stream’
  • Nepata Fassenii ‘Walker’s Low’
  • Pachyphytum ‘Bill Baker’
  • Phlebodium aureum – Rabbit’s Foot Fern
  • Phormium ‘Pink Stripe’
  • Pittosporum crassifolium – Karo
  • Pittosporum ‘Silver Sheen’
  • Plecostachys serpyllifolia – Cobweb Bush
  • Portulacaria afra ‘Prostrate Form Variegata’ – Dwarf Elephant Food
  • Polygala x dalmaisiana – Sweet Pea Shrub
  • Prostanthera ovalifolia ‘Variegata’ – Variegated Mint Bush
  • Pultenea
  • Rosa ‘Polka’
  • Sarcococca – sweet box
  • Scaeveola ‘Mini’
  • Senecio haworthii – Woolly Senecio
  • Sedum rupestre ‘Angelina’ – Golden Sedum
  • Sedum blue spruce
  • Senecio crassissimus – Vertical Leaf Senecio
  • Senecio jacobsenii – Trailing Jade
  • Silene uniflora ‘Variegated’
  • Sollya heterophylla – Australian Bluebell Creeper
  • Strobilanthes gossypinus – Persian shield
  • Tagates
  • Tradescantia pallida ‘Purple Heart’ – Purple Spiderwort
  • Westringia fruticosa ‘Morning Light’

“A garden is a grand teacher. It teaches patience and careful watchfulness it teaches industry and thrift above all, it teaches entire trust.” — Gertrude Jekyll


Aloe Species

Category:

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant suitable for xeriscaping

Sun Exposure:

Foliage:

Foliage Color:

Height:

Spacing:

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 °C (25 °F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 °C (30 °F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 °C (35 °F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 °C (40 °F)

Where to Grow:

Danger:

Plant has spines or sharp edges use extreme caution when handling

Bloom Color:

Bloom Characteristics:

Bloom Size:

Bloom Time:

Other details:

Soil pH requirements:

Patent Information:

Propagation Methods:

By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets)

Seed Collecting:

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Vista, California(9 reports)

Gardeners' Notes:

On Jul 28, 2014, Fires_in_motion from Vacherie, LA (Zone 9a) wrote:

My first thought upon seeing this at a big box store the other day was "Wow, that's an interesting Aloe brevifolia with flatter, wider leaves than usual I've gotta get it." (A. brevifolia is one of my favorite succulents ever.) Then I saw the tag saying E. elgonica, a species I'd never heard of, despite being a big aloe geek. So of course I bought it, but I have some suspicion that it has some A. brevifolia in it, since the leaves are a lot stubbier (shorter & wider) than the ones in the photos on DG and other sites. Maybe they elongate as the plant ages? Not sure if my plant was grown from seed (in which case the leaves would be expected to be stubbier) or from a cutting (in which case they'd be expected to be longer, like those of a mature plant).
In any case, this is an incr. read more edibly cool, robust aloe, with the added benefit of growing only up to about 3-5 feet tall, which will make it easy to move indoors in the winter if needed here (zone 8B/9A). If indeed the ones sold at big box stores (grown by a Cali company whose name begins with "A") do have some A. brevifolia in them, that would be good, in terms of making the mature plant both smaller and more cold hardy. I guess time will tell.

On Sep 27, 2006, thistlesifter from Vista, CA wrote:

I have had this plant nearly a year and it is already a favorite. It has a graceful clumping form with curvy lush deeply colored leaves and prominent elegant leaf spines. Its flower is a welcome sight for aloe lovers as it is one of the early aloe flowers of late summer.

It is of easy culture, not at aloe picky about watering overhead and does well in pure DG.

On Dec 7, 2003, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

Nice looking Kenyan Aloe that gets a lot of nice red color in full sun and heat. It's a suckering aloe that can either be a low growing plant if kept totally devoid of water, or grow up to 3-4' tall if given some protection and water. Rosettes up to 1' across. Leaves recurved, shiny with striking, large, sharp deltoid teeth along the margins. Flowers simple, to slightly branched, and deep red in early spring (northern hemisphere). however I have seen these plants also bloom, though not as heavily, in mid to late summer in southern California (July- August).


Watch the video: PlantSnap identifies an Aloe Aloe bulbillifera