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Banana Plant Houseplant – Taking Care Of A Banana Tree Inside

Banana Plant Houseplant – Taking Care Of A Banana Tree Inside


By: Nikki Tilley, Author of The Bulb-o-licious Garden

Banana plant houseplant? That’s right. If you are not fortunate enough to live in a warm region where you can grow this tropical plant outdoors, then why not grow an indoor banana plant (Musa oriana) instead. With enough light and water, an indoor banana tree makes an excellent houseplant.

A banana plant houseplant offers interesting foliage and white flowers emerging from purple buds. Keep in mind that while some banana tree varieties produce edible fruit, others do not—like that of Musa basjoo. Therefore, be sure to look into the type of indoor banana tree you have or want to ensure that it will accommodate your needs and vice versa.

Below you will find some tips for taking care of a banana tree inside.

How to Grow Banana Inside

Since an indoor banana tree can get rather large, you may opt for growing a dwarf variety. Even still, you’ll need a large container that is deep enough to accommodate all of its roots. It should also provide adequate drainage.

Like outdoor banana plants, an indoor banana plant needs rich, humus-like and well-draining soil as well as plenty of sunlight. In fact, indoor banana trees require bright light for about 12 hours or so for most varieties. However, you need to protect the banana plant from getting too hot to prevent scorching. Banana plants also do best in soils with pH levels between 5.5 and 7.0. Plant the banana rhizome upright and be sure the roots are well covered with soil.

Taking Care of a Banana Tree Inside

Banana plant houseplants require frequent feeding, especially during their active growth in warm weather. Therefore, you’ll want to give them a balanced soluble fertilizer each month. Apply this evenly throughout the container.

These plants also like hot and humid conditions. Indoor bananas need warm temperatures; night temperatures around 67 degrees F. (19 C.) are ideal and day temperatures in the 80s (26 C.).

While an indoor banana tree needs more water than those grown outside, it should never be allowed to sit in water, which inevitably leads to root rot. Allow the plant to dry out some between waterings. Misting their foliage can help keep them hydrated and happy. In addition, an indoor banana plant should have its leaves wiped down occasionally with a damp rag or sponge to collect any accumulated dust.

Indoor banana plants can spend summers outdoors in warmer regions. However, they need to be protected from wind and cold. Make sure to acclimate plants both before bringing them back inside once it cools and just after setting them out in warm weather. To make moving plants easier, use rolling platforms.

Taking care of a banana tree inside is just that easy. When you grow a banana inside, it is like you are bringing a little of the tropics into your home.

This article was last updated on


Growing Banana Trees: Planting Guide, Care, Problems, and Harvest

Bethany Hayes

Bethany is a suburban homesteader who grows over 30 types of vegetables in her garden every year to provide the vegetables needed to feed her family of six for the entire year. She practices organic gardening without the use of any pesticide and chemical.

Does your family eat so many bananas that you want to try growing bananas in your garden? These fabulous fruits grow on trees anywhere that has the right environmental conditions.

If you live in a colder climate, you won’t see banana trees along your highway or in your neighbor’s backyard. Fruiting banana plants require warm weather and plenty of humidity to grow.

But if you live in a tropical climate, you can grow bananas, and those who don’t can try growing bananas in containers. Let’s take a look at what you need to know.


How to Grow Bananas in a Greenhouse

Remove all but one of the emerging shoots. This will help focus all the plant’s energy on producing fruit.

Protect your banana plant from temperatures below freezing. Wrap the leaves and stalks in blankets and plastic. If freezing temperatures are sustained for a long period of time, your banana plant will not survive.

Do not let the plant stand in water, especially in cold weather, as this will cause root rot and kill the plant.

The banana is a tropical fruit consumed all over the world. Banana plants are often mistakenly called banana trees because of their height and wide foliage. They grow well in warm, humid climates and can produce several harvests of fruit. Reaping the benefits of growing your own banana tree takes patience, as most banana plants take nine months to reach maturity and produce fruit. Greenhouse conditions are ideal for healthy banana plants. As space is often limited in greenhouses, try growing dwarf varieties of banana plants to maximize your efforts.

Order a young banana plant online, or visit your local nursery for the species best suited to your area. Banana plants can also grow from “suckers” or the shoots growing from the base of the stem. You can cut a new sucker from a friend’s plant, but make sure it is at least partially rooted and no less than six inches tall.

  • The banana is a tropical fruit consumed all over the world.
  • As space is often limited in greenhouses, try growing dwarf varieties of banana plants to maximize your efforts.

Prepare your container. Use a pot twice as wide as the container your young banana plant comes in and half the height the adult banana plant will be. Place large rocks or shards of clay pots in the bottom of the pot. Fill it with a mixture of 20 percent perlite and the rest compost or very rich potting soil.

Make a hole in the soil in the center of the pot with your hand. Place the banana plant in the center of the hole and fill in with dirt. The roots should be fully covered with at least a half inch of soil. Use your hand to pat the soil around the base of the plant to eliminate any air pockets.

  • Use a pot twice as wide as the container your young banana plant comes in and half the height the adult banana plant will be.
  • Use your hand to pat the soil around the base of the plant to eliminate any air pockets.

Place your banana plant in an sunny location within the greenhouse. Banana plants need 10 to 12 hours of sunlight a day, all year round.

Water the banana plant regularly. Soak the plant with water until it begins to run from the bottom of the pot. Allow the soil to dry to a half inch in depth between waterings. It is crucial to keep the soil of your banana plant moist but well-drained.

Banana plants are heavy feeders and benefit from the regular use of a balanced fertilizer intended for fruiting plants. Fertilize up to once a month.

  • Place your banana plant in an sunny location within the greenhouse.
  • Allow the soil to dry to a half inch in depth between waterings.

Monitor greenhouse conditions. For optimum growth, the temperature in your greenhouse should stay between 70° and 80° Fahrenheit. The greenhouse should be considerably humid.


Winds, cold temperatures and frost can all damage your banana. To protect against winds, place the banana's pot next to a fence or in a sheltered spot. For protection against cold temperatures, set the container in the warmest part of your yard or deck, such as next to a building or near to an asphalt driveway. Frosts will kill the foliage on the banana, but the rhizomes will survive if the soil is above 22 degrees Fahrenheit. To help ensure the survival of your plant, cover the plant itself with a blanket or burlap, layer the soil with straw or mulch, or bring the banana indoors for the winter.

Continue to give the banana plant as much light as you can during the winter, placing it in a south-facing window with direct sunlight. The plant's growth will slow down over the winter indoors, so it will not need as much water or as much fertilizer as it did outdoors during the growing season. Continue to keep the soil moist, and reduce feeding to once a month. Move the plant outdoors when all danger of frost has passed in the spring.


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The right supplies can take the guesswork out of caring for your plants – and turn care from a daily to weekly routine. Through our grow tests, we’ve found these products to produce the best indoor Banana (and also have simple maintenance). Plants are adaptable and can grow in many different conditions, so they are by no means necessary if you already have other supplies.

Best Containers for Banana: Ceramic Self Watering Planters

Plants thrive on consistent moisture but can suffer if they’re waterlogged. A semi-porous ceramic self regulates ideal conditions. Our favorite is the COSWIP planter . Runner up is XS Self Watering Planter by Wet Pot .

Best Soil for Banana: Standard Potting Mix

Banana likes a rich and moist root zone – so you are best off with a standard potting mix – we like this Organic Mix by Espoma .

Best Nutrients for Banana: Balanced Blend

Banana likes nutrients that are equal parts nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium (with NPK numbers like 10-10-10). For a Balanced Blend we recommend: Dr Earth All Purpose

Best Light for Banana: DIY or Soltech

There is a very small chance that you have the bright windows needed to grow these without a grow light. If you are looking for a higher-end option – we love the Aspect Light by Soltech . For a more affordable option, a DIY setup using a 24W Screw-in Bulb by Sansi with a Clamp Light and Mechanical Timer works well too. Check out our complete guide on a DIY setup for less than $40 or our buying guide for screw in bulbs .


Watch the video: How to Care for Your Banana Plants