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Chamaelobivia 'Rot Violet' (Peanut Cactus)

Chamaelobivia 'Rot Violet' (Peanut Cactus)


Scientific Name

x Chamaelobivia 'Rot Violet'

Accepted Scientific Name

Echinopsis chamaecereus 'Rot Violet'

Common Names

Peanut Cactus

Synonyms

Chamaecereus 'Rot Violet'

Scientific Classification

Family: Cactaceae
Subfamily: Cactoideae
Tribe: Trichocereeae
Genus: Echinopsis

Description

x Chamaelobivia 'Rot Violet' is a hybrid between Chamaecereus silvestrii (now renamed Echinopsis chamaecereus) and Lobvia, but since both of those are now reclassified as Echinopsis, that makes this an Echinopsis hybrid. This cactus has an upright growth habit, offsetting and blooming profusely. Flowers are up to 3 inches (7.5 cm) in diameter and violet-red in color.

Hardiness

USDA hardiness zones 10a to 11b: from 30 °F (−1.1 °C) to 50 °F (+10 °C).

How to Grow and Care

If you can grow cacti and succulents successfully, you can likely grow the Echinopsis species without too much trouble. Like many cacti, they prefer a drying period between waterings, even to the point where they slightly wilt. When you water, however, you should water deeply. The plant will noticeably plump up. It is imperative that the cactus is not exposed to prolonged dampness and sitting water. Never let your cactus sit in a dish of water. Lastly, make sure to fertilize during the growing season for the best results.

Echinopsis can be easily rooted from offsets, which tend to cluster around the base of the mother plant. Cut offsets close to the stem, at the narrowest possible place. When rooting cacti from cuttings, let the fresh cutting dry out slightly on a paper towel and cut the cacti at the narrowest place possible. After a few days to a few weeks, depending on the size of the cut surface, the cut surface should have dried out and formed a callous, or slightly rough opening. Once the callous has formed, place the cutting in a rooting mixture of fast-draining cacti soil… – See more at: How to Grow and Care for Echinopsis

Origin

x Chamaelobivia 'Rot Violet' is a hybrid between Chamaecereus silvestrii (now renamed Echinopsis chamaecereus) and Lobvia, but since both of those are now reclassified as Echinopsis, that makes this an Echinopsis hybrid.

Links

  • Back to genus Echinopsis
  • Succulentopedia: Browse succulents by Scientific Name, Common Name, Genus, Family, USDA Hardiness Zone, Origin, or cacti by Genus

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Chamaelobivia 'Rot Violet' (Peanut Cactus) - garden

Accepted Scientific Name: Echinopsis chamaecereus cv. Rot Violet
Chamaelobivia hybid

Origin and Habitat: Garden origin (Nursery produced cultivar) Hybrid Chamaecereus sylvestris x Lobivia sp.

Description: The Chamaelobivia hybrids. Chamaecereus silvestrii (now renamed Echinopsis chamaecereus) is an old species widely hybridized with various Lobivias, hence Chamaelobivia (intergenic hybrid of Chamaecereus and Lobivia), but since both of those are now reclassified as Echinopsis, that makes this an Echinopsis hybrid.
Chamaelobivia are very popular hybrids that develop really amazing flowers of different colours on the original "peanut" body and many of these hybrids have cultivar names. This plants soon form spectacular clumps with 20-30 (or more) flowers at a time, and are quite a sight. They are often thicker, stronger, larger-growing than C. sylvestrii, and tend not to have the typical peanut shaped offsets. The offsets produced are more strongly attached to the main stems.
Most of these hybrids can grow outside all year and can take a lot of sun. Hardy from -4° to -12° C, depending on clone.

Subspecies, varieties, forms and cultivars of plants belonging to the Echinopsis hybrid (Chamaelobivia) group


х Chamaelobivia cv. Rot Violet (Echinopsis chamaecereus cv. Rot Violet) Photo by: Valentino Vallicelli
х Chamaelobivia cv. Rot Violet (Echinopsis chamaecereus cv. Rot Violet) Photo by: Cactus Art
х Chamaelobivia cv. Rot Violet (Echinopsis chamaecereus cv. Rot Violet) Photo by: Cactus Art

Send a photo of this plant.

The gallery now contains thousands of pictures, however it is possible to do even more. We are, of course, seeking photos of species not yet shown in the gallery but not only that, we are also looking for better pictures than those already present. Read More.

Cultivation and Propagation: The Chamaelobiva hybrids are very easy to grow, and are the ideal plants for beginners. The parents of all Chamelobivia come from mountainous areas, so they like bright light, cool and dry conditions in the winter. The whole Chamelobivia complex has delightful flowers and the plants remain compact, and clumps can easily be managed by division. They flower freely indoors if conditions suit them.
Growth rate: Chamaelobivia is a relatively fast growing and easily flowering species that will make large clumps given the best conditions.
Soils: This species is without problems in a very open mineral mix with at least 50% sand or pumice grit and a pH slightly on the acidic side.
Repotting: They will occupy a small pot comfortably, and eventually remain a manageable sized house plant. It is better that they are repotted regularly. Repotting will increase the number and size of stems, and will increase the number of flowers produced. Repot yearly until they reach about 100 mm in size, then every two or three years will suffice. Repotting is best done at the end of winter, but can be done at other times, too. Do not water for a couple of weeks after repotting, to reduce risk of root rot via broken roots. A layer of 'pea' gravel at the bottom of the pot improves drainage. A layer of decorative gravel as a top dressing helps prevent the caking of the potting mix, which decreases the rate of water absorption. It also keeps the perlite and pumice from blowing everywhere, and looks nice.
Watering: It requires full sun or light shade and careful watering to keep plant compact, and maintain strong and dense spines and allow the pot to dry out between waterings. Keep dry in winter at a minimum temperature of 0°C. Rebutia albipilosa tends to rot if too wet. The plants can be placed outdoors in April, but protected from rain and direct sunlight. Water them thoroughly when placed out, and again in two weeks, and again in one week. After one month the plants are ready to be placed out in full sun and full rain for the summer. During dry spells the collection is watered once a week, during hot dry spells, twice a week.
Fertilization: Feed with a high potassium fertilizer in summer.
Hardiness: It is reputedly resistant to frost if kept on the dry side prior to, and during, cold weather and requires a winter rest period (hardy to -7° C, or less for short periods). They grow in nature at high altitudes, and do not thrive well at high temperatures in cultivation. They will often go dormant in mid-summer, and resume growth again when the weather cools in late August. They can tolerate amazingly low temperatures for long periods of time. All species can take light frost, even when not bone dry. It is generally accepted that plants kept at too high a temperature, or watered too much during the winter rest period, will not bloom the following year. They will be perfectly happy in pots outdoors from April to September if protected from torrential rain and hail. However some warmth throughout the year will increase the grower's success (minimum 3° C during rest season).
Exposition: The plant tolerates extremely bright situations but enjoys filtered sunlight or afternoon shade, inside it needs bright light, and some direct sun. Tends to bronze in strong light, which encourages flowering and heavy spine production, but is likely to suffer from sun scorch or stunted growth if over exposed to direct sunlight during the hottest part of the day in summer.
Uses: It is an excellent plant for container growing. It always looks good and stays small. It look fine in a cold greenhouse and frame or outdoor in a rockery.
Pests & diseases: All, especially the young, are susceptible to red spider mites.
Rot: It is especially prone to root rot, therefore, underpot in a smaller container filled with very porous compost. However rot it is only a minor problem with cacti if the plants are watered and “aired” correctly. If they are not, fungicides won't help all that much.
Propagation: By cuttings, as it branches freely from the base. It can also be grown from seeds or by graft. Seeds can be sown in the spring or summer. The seedlings should not be disturbed until they are well rooted, after which they can be planted separately in small pots. Easy to propagate from offsets. Small joints are produced in quantities (peanuts). These offsets can be detached and planted immediately, as they root easily with no assistance when they touch the ground. Just let them lay on the soil and you have a new start.


Chamaelobivia 'Rot Violet' (Peanut Cactus) - garden

Origin and Habitat: Garden origin (Nursery produced cultivar) Hybrid Chamaecereus sylvestris x Lobivia sp.

Description: The Chamaelobivia hybrids. Chamaecereus silvestri (now renamed Echinopsis chamaecereus) is an old species widely hybridized with various Lobivias, hence Chamaelobivia (intergenic hybrid of Chamaecereus and Lobivia), but since both of those are now reclassified as Echinopsis, that makes this an Echinopsis hybrid.
Chamaelobivia are very popular hybrids that develop really amazing flowers of different colours on the original "peanut" body and many of these hybrids have cultivar names. This plants soon form spectacular clumps with 20-30 (or more) flowers at a time, and are quite a sight. They are often thicker, stronger, larger-growing than C. sylvestrii, and tend not to have the typical peanut shaped offsets. The offsets produced are more strongly attached to the main stems.
Most of these hybrids can grow outside all year and can take a lot of sun. Hardy from -4° to -12° C, depending on clone.

Subspecies, varieties, forms and cultivars of plants belonging to the Echinopsis hybrid (Chamaelobivia) group

Cultivation and Propagation: The Chamaelobiva hybrids are very easy to grow, and are the ideal plants for beginners. The parents of all Chamelobivia come from mountainous areas, so they like bright light, cool and dry conditions in the winter. The whole Chamelobivia complex has delightful flowers and the plants remain compact, and clumps can easily be managed by division. They flower freely indoors if conditions suit them.
Growth rate: Chamaelobivia is a relatively fast growing and easily flowering species that will make large clumps given the best conditions.
Soils: This species is without problems in a very open mineral mix with at least 50% sand or pumice grit and a pH slightly on the acidic side.
Repotting: They will occupy a small pot comfortably, and eventually remain a manageable sized house plant. It is better that they are repotted regularly. Repotting will increase the number and size of stems, and will increase the number of flowers produced. Repot yearly until they reach about 100 mm in size, then every two or three years will suffice. Repotting is best done at the end of winter, but can be done at other times, too. Do not water for a couple of weeks after repotting, to reduce risk of root rot via broken roots. A layer of 'pea' gravel at the bottom of the pot improves drainage. A layer of decorative gravel as a top dressing helps prevent the caking of the potting mix, which decreases the rate of water absorption. It also keeps the perlite and pumice from blowing everywhere, and looks nice.
Watering: It requires full sun or light shade and careful watering to keep plant compact, and maintain strong and dense spines and allow the pot to dry out between waterings. Keep dry in winter at a minimum temperature of 0°C. Rebutia albipilosa tends to rot if too wet. The plants can be placed outdoors in April, but protected from rain and direct sunlight. Water them thoroughly when placed out, and again in two weeks, and again in one week. After one month the plants are ready to be placed out in full sun and full rain for the summer. During dry spells the collection is watered once a week, during hot dry spells, twice a week.
Fertilization: Feed with a high potassium fertilizer in summer.
Hardiness: It is reputedly resistant to frost if kept on the dry side prior to, and during, cold weather and requires a winter rest period (hardy to -7° C, or less for short periods). They grow in nature at high altitudes, and do not thrive well at high temperatures in cultivation. They will often go dormant in mid-summer, and resume growth again when the weather cools in late August. They can tolerate amazingly low temperatures for long periods of time. All species can take light frost, even when not bone dry. It is generally accepted that plants kept at too high a temperature, or watered too much during the winter rest period, will not bloom the following year. They will be perfectly happy in pots outdoors from April to September if protected from torrential rain and hail. However some warmth throughout the year will increase the grower's success (minimum 3° C during rest season).
Exposition: The plant tolerates extremely bright situations but enjoys filtered sunlight or afternoon shade, inside it needs bright light, and some direct sun. Tends to bronze in strong light, which encourages flowering and heavy spine production, but is likely to suffer from sun scorch or stunted growth if over exposed to direct sunlight during the hottest part of the day in summer.
Uses: It is an excellent plant for container growing. It always looks good and stays small. It look fine in a cold greenhouse and frame or outdoor in a rockery.
Pests & diseases: All, especially the young, are susceptible to red spider mites.
Rot: It is especially prone to root rot, therefore, underpot in a smaller container filled with very porous compost. However rot it is only a minor problem with cacti if the plants are watered and “aired” correctly. If they are not, fungicides won't help all that much.
Propagation: By cuttings, as it branches freely from the base. It can also be grown from seeds or by graft. Seeds can be sown in the spring or summer. The seedlings should not be disturbed until they are well rooted, after which they can be planted separately in small pots. Easy to propagate from offsets. Small joints are produced in quantities (peanuts). These offsets can be detached and planted immediately, as they root easily with no assistance when they touch the ground. Just let them lay on the soil and you have a new start.


Chamaelobivia 'Rot Violet' (Peanut Cactus) - garden

Accepted Scientific Name: Echinopsis chamaecereus cv. Cactus Art
Chamaelobivia hybid

Origin and Habitat: Garden origin (Nursery produced cultivar) Hybrid Chamaecereus sylvestris x Lobivia sp.

Description: The Chamaelobivia hybrids. Chamaecereus silvestrii (now renamed Echinopsis chamaecereus) is an old species widely hybridized with various Lobivias, hence Chamaelobivia (intergenic hybrid of Chamaecereus and Lobivia), but since both of those are now reclassified as Echinopsis, that makes this an Echinopsis hybrid.
Chamaelobivia are very popular hybrids that develop really amazing flowers of different colours on the original "peanut" body and many of these hybrids have cultivar names. This plants soon form spectacular clumps with 20-30 (or more) flowers at a time, and are quite a sight. They are often thicker, stronger, larger-growing than C. sylvestrii, and tend not to have the typical peanut shaped offsets. The offsets produced are more strongly attached to the main stems.
Most of these hybrids can grow outside all year and can take a lot of sun. Hardy from -4° to -12° C, depending on clone.

Subspecies, varieties, forms and cultivars of plants belonging to the Echinopsis hybrid (Chamaelobivia) group


х Chamaelobivia cv. Cactus Art (Echinopsis chamaecereus cv. Cactus Art) Photo by: Valentino Vallicelli
х Chamaelobivia cv. Cactus Art (Echinopsis chamaecereus cv. Cactus Art) Photo by: Valentino Vallicelli
х Chamaelobivia cv. Cactus Art (Echinopsis chamaecereus cv. Cactus Art) Photo by: Valentino Vallicelli
х Chamaelobivia cv. Cactus Art (Echinopsis chamaecereus cv. Cactus Art) Photo by: Valentino Vallicelli
х Chamaelobivia cv. Cactus Art (Echinopsis chamaecereus cv. Cactus Art) Photo by: Valentino Vallicelli
х Chamaelobivia cv. Cactus Art (Echinopsis chamaecereus cv. Cactus Art) Photo by: Valentino Vallicelli
х Chamaelobivia cv. Cactus Art (Echinopsis chamaecereus cv. Cactus Art) Photo by: Valentino Vallicelli

Send a photo of this plant.

The gallery now contains thousands of pictures, however it is possible to do even more. We are, of course, seeking photos of species not yet shown in the gallery but not only that, we are also looking for better pictures than those already present. Read More.

Cultivation and Propagation: The Chamaelobiva hybrids are very easy to grow, and are the ideal plants for beginners. The parents of all Chamelobivia come from mountainous areas, so they like bright light, cool and dry conditions in the winter. The whole Chamelobivia complex has delightful flowers and the plants remain compact, and clumps can easily be managed by division. They flower freely indoors if conditions suit them.
Growth rate: Chamaelobivia is a relatively fast growing and easily flowering species that will make large clumps given the best conditions.
Soils: This species is without problems in a very open mineral mix with at least 50% sand or pumice grit and a pH slightly on the acidic side.
Repotting: They will occupy a small pot comfortably, and eventually remain a manageable sized house plant. It is better that they are repotted regularly. Repotting will increase the number and size of stems, and will increase the number of flowers produced. Repot yearly until they reach about 100 mm in size, then every two or three years will suffice. Repotting is best done at the end of winter, but can be done at other times, too. Do not water for a couple of weeks after repotting, to reduce risk of root rot via broken roots. A layer of 'pea' gravel at the bottom of the pot improves drainage. A layer of decorative gravel as a top dressing helps prevent the caking of the potting mix, which decreases the rate of water absorption. It also keeps the perlite and pumice from blowing everywhere, and looks nice.
Watering: It requires full sun or light shade and careful watering to keep plant compact, and maintain strong and dense spines and allow the pot to dry out between waterings. Keep dry in winter at a minimum temperature of 0°C. Rebutia albipilosa tends to rot if too wet. The plants can be placed outdoors in April, but protected from rain and direct sunlight. Water them thoroughly when placed out, and again in two weeks, and again in one week. After one month the plants are ready to be placed out in full sun and full rain for the summer. During dry spells the collection is watered once a week, during hot dry spells, twice a week.
Fertilization: Feed with a high potassium fertilizer in summer.
Hardiness: It is reputedly resistant to frost if kept on the dry side prior to, and during, cold weather and requires a winter rest period (hardy to -7° C, or less for short periods). They grow in nature at high altitudes, and do not thrive well at high temperatures in cultivation. They will often go dormant in mid-summer, and resume growth again when the weather cools in late August. They can tolerate amazingly low temperatures for long periods of time. All species can take light frost, even when not bone dry. It is generally accepted that plants kept at too high a temperature, or watered too much during the winter rest period, will not bloom the following year. They will be perfectly happy in pots outdoors from April to September if protected from torrential rain and hail. However some warmth throughout the year will increase the grower's success (minimum 3° C during rest season).
Exposition: The plant tolerates extremely bright situations but enjoys filtered sunlight or afternoon shade, inside it needs bright light, and some direct sun. Tends to bronze in strong light, which encourages flowering and heavy spine production, but is likely to suffer from sun scorch or stunted growth if over exposed to direct sunlight during the hottest part of the day in summer.
Uses: It is an excellent plant for container growing. It always looks good and stays small. It look fine in a cold greenhouse and frame or outdoor in a rockery.
Pests & diseases: All, especially the young, are susceptible to red spider mites.
Rot: It is especially prone to root rot, therefore, underpot in a smaller container filled with very porous compost. However rot it is only a minor problem with cacti if the plants are watered and “aired” correctly. If they are not, fungicides won't help all that much.
Propagation: Easy to propagate from cuttings, as it branches freely from the base. Small joints are produced in quantities (peanuts). These offsets can be detached and planted immediately, as they root easily with no assistance when they touch the ground. Just let them lay on the soil and you have a new start. Even better the cutting may be inserted in a container filled with firmed cactus potting mix topped with a surface layer of coarse grit. They should be placed in the coarse grit only this prevents the cut end from becoming too wet and allows the roots to penetrate the rich compost underneath. The cuttings should root in 2 to 6 weeks. The cuttings will take root in a minimum temperature of 20° C. Cuttings of healthy shoots can be taken in the spring and summer, cut them with a sharp, sterile knife, leave the cutting in a warm, dry place for a week or weeks (depending on how thick the cutting is) until a callus forms over the wound.
How to Grow new hybrid from seeds: The reproduction by seed is also possible but the offspring will not be identical to the mother plant. The Chamaecereus-Lobivia will produce several fruit with hundreds of seeds each season. After the flower dies off and the pods are ripen it is possible to collect them from under the dried flower. Then place the seeds in some water to soak overnight. Fill germination trays with a well blended mixture of 60% peat moss 40% vermiculite and one to one part of coarse sand or pumice. Use a horse syringe to suck the small seeds and some of the water into the syringe. With the syringe, distribute the seeds evenly in the germination tray, shaking the syringe so the seeds don't settle at the bottom and all come out at once. Place then the trays in filtered sun, cover with a glass sheet and keep the soil moist until the seeds germinate in approximately 2 to 6 weeks. They will look like small green spheres, somehow red in bright light. Then gradually remove the glass cover. When the small cacti start to sprout tiny spines, use a pair of tweezers to transfer them from the propagation trays into 5 cm pots filled with the same soil mix used in the germination trays. Allow the small cacti to grow for about one/two year and then move the cacti to 10 cm pots and allow them to grow further.


Watch the video: saving rat tail cactus from rotting