Collections

Hippocampus - Seahorse

Hippocampus - Seahorse


SEAHORSE


Note 1

SCIENTIFIC CLASSIFICATION

Kingdom

:

Animalia

Phylum

:

Chordata

Subphylum

:

Vertebrata

Class

:

Actinopterygii

Order

:

Gasterosteiformes

Suborder

:

Syngnathoidei

Family

:

Syngnathidae

Subfamily

:

Hippocampinae

Kind

:

Hippocampus

Species

:

Hippocampus

spp.

Common name

: seahorse or hippocampus

GENERAL DATA

  • Body length: 5 - 30 cm depending on the species
  • Weight: up to 230 gr
  • Lifespan: up to 5 years

HABITAT AND GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION

The seahorse or hippocampus, contrary to what may appear from its so particular appearance, is a fish, widespread along the coasts of the temperate and warm seas and oceans all over the world that lives up to a maximum of 50 m of depth. algae and the fronds of marine plants and is not easily identifiable as it camouflages itself in an extraordinary way with the surrounding environment.

Given that it is a widely diffused fish in aquariums, it can be said that its distribution in captivity is planetary.

In the Mediterranean we find only two species: the common seahorse Hippocampusramulosus and the snub-nosed or short-snouted seahorse Hippocampus hippocampus.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

The seahorse has an elongated body, compressed laterally, covered with bony plates, rigid, arranged in a ring along the trunk that protect it from smaller predators.

The head is placed at right angles to the rest of the body, it is tapered, characterized by a long snout that works like a "vacuum cleaner" in the sense that it sucks water to retain the plankton.

The same family to which the Syngnathidae whose word means in Greek "with joined jaws" indicates that all belonging to the genus Hippocampus, they have a tubiform snout, provided with a mouth placed at the end of the snout and devoid of teeth.

On the top of the head there is a sort of crown, more or less evident according to the species formed by the bony plates of the skeleton whose function is not yet known.

Frontally there are the eyes that rotate independently from each other allowing this animal a wide-ranging vision.

All fins except the dorsal one are absent or extremely small in size. The seahorse moves thanks to the fan-shaped dorsal fin which has the particularity of being formed by flexible extensions of the dorsal fin instead of fin rays. Its peculiarity is that it swims upright by moving the small dorsal fin. When it swims quickly, for example in case of danger, it is able to make up to 70 swings of the fin per minute by leaning forward in an almost horizontal position and extending the tail in order to create less friction with the water, reaching up to 20 cm per second.

Some species of hippocampus have spiny dermal appendages on the head (eg Hippocampus ramulosus).

It has a prehensile tail used to anchor itself to the algae to avoid being dragged by the current.

The different species of seahorse are distinguished by the number of rings in the trunk and how they have shaped the upper part of the head.

They are fish that have sexual dimorphism as the male is much longer than the female which is more compact and less elongated.

It is not known precisely how long their life is as it has never been ascertained in nature. In captivity, some species have been seen to live up to 5 years.

CHARACTER, BEHAVIOR AND SOCIAL LIFE

The seahorse is a fairly shy fish even if it is not aggressive towards its peers. It usually lives either alone or in pairs and is a daytime animal.

A particularity of the seahorse is to change color according to different circumstances or the environment in which it is found. In practice it is a sort of protective camouflage but also social as it has been observed that the change in color of the livery also occurs in situations of no danger but closely linked to a particular social status such as: during an illness, courtship or coupling.

They are accustomed to perform ritual dances, male and female, every day, during the male's arrival.

EATING HABITS

The only nourishment of the seahorse is zooplankton: small crustaceans, fish and larvae that it catches by sucking them greedily with its long snout. Contrary to what it may seem from their tiny and tame appearance, the seahorse is a very eager predator that patiently waits for hours for its prey to pass by to devour it.

REPRODUCTION AND GROWTH OF THE SMALL

The peculiarity that makes this species even more spectacular is that the eggs are raised by the male and not by the female. In fact, when the reproductive season approaches, the male hippocampus develops a sort of pocket in the ventral part and begins to court the female with ritual dances so that she lays the eggs in her pocket. The female then places her ovipositor in the male's incubator pocket and transfers her own eggs (see video below).


COUPLING

Once the female has laid them, the male fertilizes them with his sperm and thus begins the incubation period which lasts from 4 to 6 weeks.

The incubator bag can be considered a sort of "pseudoplacenta" because after the eggs have been laid the walls thicken and become more porous. Inside the sac also circulates oxygen, nourishment (the capillary network of this pseudoplacenta feeds the eggs); the waste is removed and there is a real osmoregulation, that is to say the regulation of the saline concentration of the liquid in the bag to gradually accustom the young to the marine environment.

During the whole period of the incubation of the eggs, the female makes daily visits to the male and performs ritual dances with him for about 5 minutes.

BIRTH OF YOUNG HIPPOCAMPS

After 4-6 weeks the seahorse begins to have muscle contractions that will allow the expulsion of the young seahorses from the pocket (see video on the side). of very small dimensions and not yet fully formatic they immediately move away to start an independent life. The father, at that point, cleans the pocket well, preparing it to welcome a new brood

Once the babies are born they no longer receive any parental care.


BIRTH OF THE SMALL HIPPOCAMPS

PREDATION

The main predator of these very particular fish is the man who hunts them for the trade of live animals to be sold for aquariums. Natural predators of the adult seahorse are few due to their physical structure which makes them unappetizing for other animals. They are however masters in avoiding predation thanks to camouflage; however, sea turtles, tuna, crabs and rays have been found in the stomachs.

STATE OF THE POPULATION

In the Red list of the IUNC 2009.2 33 species of Hippocampus (of the approximately 50 classified) are mentioned, each with different degrees of vulnerability. For the most part there is insufficient information to make a direct or indirect assessment of the risk of extinction, therefore they are classified as DATA DEFICIENT (DD); while many others are classified as vulnerable VULNERABLE) (V) or even with very high risk of extinction of an ENDANGERED nature (EN).

Seahorses are listed in CITES Appendix II (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Fauna and Flora, simply note as Washington Convention) which includes species not necessarily threatened with extinction, but whose trade must be controlled in order to avoid exploitation incompatible with their survival, especially in Asian countries as they are widely exploited in Chinese folk medicine and by numerous Asian ethnic groups.

CURIOSITY'

The name Hippocampus comes from the Greek Hippo «horse »because it resembles a horse (hence the name seahorse) e kampe "Caterpillar" because of the rings that form its body which are reminiscent of a caterpillar.

Note

(1) Original photograph courtesy of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)


Hippocampus

Hippocampus Rafinesque, 1810 is a genus of fish of the Syngnathidae family which currently includes 54 species [1] of saltwater fish commonly known as sea ​​horses or hippocampi, due to the head that resembles that of a small horse.


Index

The seahorse is present in the Mediterranean Sea, in the eastern Atlantic Ocean from the Gulf of Guinea, near the Canary Islands to the southern British Isles. It is often found around 10 meters deep, near algae or Posidonia oceanica which it clings to with its tail.

Body yellow or multicolored, sometimes red, gray or brown. Pointed head, rather short. It has no excrescences formed by the exoskeleton on the body, typical of other species of the same genus, such as the H. guttulatus. It has a dorsal fin and a little developed pectoral fins.

They feed on small crustaceans and algae. [2]

It is an ovoviviparous species. The female, after fertilization, lays 2 mm diameter eggs which are collected in the pocket placed on the male's belly. From this pocket, after two months, small horses of 15 mm are born. [2]

Unlike the H. guttulatus the two sexes do not hold back, during the mating, by wrapping the tail.

The hippocampus represents the emblem of two Italian football teams: Cesena and Salernitana.


Index

All such fish Hippocampus they have the same physical characteristics and stand out from the rest of the fish. They do not swim backwards and the physical structure is centered on a vertical rather than a horizontal axis, so the seahorses have an upright position, even if during swimming they assume a more hydrodynamic, advanced position. An arched neck positions the head forward, with a characteristic equine shape and an elongated and tubular muzzle. The pectoral fins (if present) are positioned as always after the gill openings, but the particular physical shape makes them look more like equine ears. The back is not very pronounced, with a dorsal fin while the ventral profile is particularly arched. The caudal fin is actually an extension of the body, it is mobile and prehensile, used as a limb and as a support. During swimming it is often rolled up on itself. The whole body is strengthened by a bony armor, in many species enriched with sharp edges and quills that make the seahorse an unappetizing prey. Characteristic are supra-ocular edges and a bony crown around the head. In many species the structure of the bony armor accentuates the already high mimicry of the coloring.
The dimensions vary from species to species, as well as the livery. They also have the swim bladder, an organ that acts as a reservoir containing a mixture of oxygen and other gases, which allows them to float (control their position in the water column).

Playback Edit

The female lays her eggs in a special incubator pouch in the male's belly, located near the anal opening. Upon hatching, the male expels the fry with sweet-violent abdominal contractions similar to female childbirth, a rather unusual occurrence in nature, called male pregnancy. The little ones are given birth in number of about 1800, hence the saying "to be generous as a seahorse".

Seahorses are found in all waters of the world except glacial ones, mainly near the coasts where they find refuge and supports where they can anchor themselves during movements with their long prehensile tail. They are particularly common in coral reefs and seagrass beds such as Posidonia oceanica. [2]

The genus includes the following species [1].

  • Hippocampus abdominalis Lesson, 1827
  • Hippocampus alatus Kuiter, 2001
  • Hippocampus algiricus Kaup, 1856
  • Hippocampus angustus Günther, 1870
  • Hippocampus barbouri Jordan & Richardson, 1908
  • Hippocampus bargibanti Whitley, 1970
  • Hippocampus biocellatus Kuiter, 2001
  • Hippocampus borboniensis Duméril, 1870
  • Hippocampus breviceps Peters, 1869
  • Hippocampus camelopardalis Bianconi, 1854
  • Hippocampus capensis Boulenger, 1900
  • Hippocampus colemani Kuiter, 2003
  • Hippocampus comes Cantor, 1849
  • Hippocampus coronatus Temminck & Schlegel, 1850
  • Hippocampus curvicuspis Fricke, 2004
  • Hippocampus debelius Gomon & Kuiter, 2009
  • Hippocampus denise Lourie & Randall, 2003
  • Hippocampus erectus Perry, 1810
  • Hippocampus fisheri Jordan & Evermann, 1903
  • Hippocampus fuscus Rüppell, 1838
  • Hippocampus grandiceps Kuiter, 2001
  • Hippocampus guttulatus Cuvier, 1829
  • Hippocampus hendriki Kuiter, 2001
  • Hippocampus hippocampus (Linnaeus, 1758)
  • Hippocampus histrix Kaup, 1856
  • Hippocampus ingens Girard, 1858
  • Hippocampus jayakari Boulenger, 1900
  • Hippocampus jugumus Kuiter, 2001
  • Hippocampus kelloggi Jordan & Snyder, 1901
  • Hippocampus kuda Bleeker, 1852
  • Hippocampus lichtensteinii Kaup, 1856
  • Hippocampus minotaur Gomon, 1997
  • Hippocampus mohnikei Bleeker, 1853
  • Hippocampus montebelloensis Kuiter, 2001
  • Hippocampus multispinus Kuiter, 2001
  • Hippocampus paradoxus Foster & Gomon, 2010
  • Hippocampus patagonicus Piacentino & Luzzatto, 2004
  • Hippocampus pontohi Lourie & Kuiter, 2008
  • Hippocampus procerus Kuiter, 2001
  • Hippocampus pusillus Fricke, 2004
  • Hippocampus queenslandicus Horne, 2001
  • Hippocampus reidi Ginsburg, 1933
  • Hippocampus satomiae Lourie & Kuiter, 2008
  • Hippocampus semispinosus Kuiter, 2001
  • Hippocampus severnsi Lourie & Kuiter, 2008
  • Hippocampus sindonis Jordan & Snyder, 1901
  • Hippocampus spinosissimus Weber, 1913
  • Hippocampus subelongatus Castelnau, 1873
  • Hippocampus trimaculatus Leach, 1814
  • Hippocampus tyro Randall & Lourie, 2009
  • Hippocampus waleananus Gomon & Kuiter, 2009
  • Hippocampus whitei Bleeker, 1855
  • Hippocampus zebra Whitley, 1964
  • Hippocampus zosterae Jordan & Gilbert, 1882

The 2 species Hippocampus hippocampus is Hippocampus guttulatus they are the only ones present in the Mediterranean Sea, including Italian seas.

All species of the genus Hippocampus have been included in Appendix II of the Convention on International Trade of Endangered Species (CITES) [3]. Despite many international bans, in some countries it is fished to be sold dried as a decorative or curative object, especially on the Asian market.

The characteristic shapes of seahorses certainly did not escape the ancient peoples, who considered it a divine animal. It is no coincidence that Greek mythology associates the creation of the horse with the god of the sea Poseidon, who will often be depicted with a chariot pulled by seahorses. The seahorse in art is therefore represented both as it appears in reality and, above all, as a mythological animal, a mixture of terrestrial and marine creature.


Hippocampus - Seahorse

Hippocampus ramulosus Leach, 1814

Diagnosis: rings 10-12 + 36-40, D 18-21 (usually 19 or more), P 15-18 (usually 17). Snout relatively long, its length usually 2.5-2.75 in HL usually with dermal flaps on head and trunk. Color: variably brown to black, sometimes reddish or yellow usually with numerous blue-white spots. Size: to about 16 cm.

Habitat : mostly in shallow inshore waters among algae, etc. Food: no date. Reproduction : mostly brooding April-October, pouch -eggs 1.9-2.0 mm in diameter, 3-5 week incubation period, early free-living young about 15-16 mm TL.

Distribution : British Isles and southwards to Morocco, Madeira and the Azores, also Mediterranean and Black Seas, including the Sea of ​​Azov.

Eggs, larvae and young stages. Rauther, 1925: 10, pl. II (fig. 18) | d'Ancona, 1933: 296, pl. XVII (fig. 10) | Brunelli, 1922: 1, 2 pl.
Otoliths (sagitta). No date.

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Subphylum Vertebrata
Superclass Gnathostomata
Class Osteichthyes
Order Syngnathiformes
Suborder Sygnathoidei
Family Syngnathidae
Genus Hippocampus
Species Hippocampus ramulosus

Status in World Register of Marine Species

Synonym of Hippocampus guttulatus Cuvier, 1829

Scientific synonyms and common names

Hippocampus ramulosus Leach, 1814

Hippocampus ramulosus Leach, 1814, Zool. Miscell., 1: 105, pl. 47 (type locality not stated, possibly Mediterranean). Type in BMNH.
Hippocampus longirostris Schinz, 1822, Das Thierreich, 2: 262 (on Cuvier, 1817. No type locality given).
Hippocampus rosaceus Risso, 1826, Hist. nat. Europe mérid., 3: 184 (? Nice).
Hippocampus guttulatus Cuvier, 1829, Règne animal, ed. 2, 2: 363 (Mediterranean).
Hippocampus ramulosus: Lowe, 1860: 5, tab. II A. Duméril, 1870: 507 Fowler, 1936: 563 Wheeler, 1969: 252 (fig.snout too long).
Hippocampus guttulatus: Canestrini, 1872: 140 Moreau, 1881, 2: 36 Carus, 1893: 535 Lozano Rey, 1947: 669, pl. 16 (fig. 2) Soljan, 1948: 38, fig. Di Caporiacco, 1948: 93 Albuquerque, 1954-1956: 540 Poljakov et al., 1958: 214, fig. Duncker, ed. Ladiges, 1960: 191, fig. 65a Bini, 1969, 3: 173, fig. Tortonese, 1970: 465, fig. 187A.
Hippocampus antiquorum (nec Leach, 1814): Day, 1884, 2: 265, pl. 144 (fig. 7) Jenkins, 1936: 210, pl. 84 (fig. 7).
Hippocampus hippocampus microstephanus Slastenenko, 1937, Sb. Tr. Zool. Muz. Mosk. Univ., 1: 81 (not seen, quoted from Banarescu, 1964).
Hippocampusguttulatus multiannularis Ginsburg, 1937, Proc. U.S. natn. Mus., 83: 540,
fig. 56 57 (Bay of Biscay?). Types: Michigan Univ. Mus. 111747 (holotype), 111748 (paratypes).
Hippocampus guttulatus guttulatus: Ginsburg, 1937: 543 Albuquerque, 1956: 541.
Hippocampus europaeus (nec Ginsburg, 1933): Poll, 1947: 188 (text only).
Hippocampus hippocampus microstephanus: Slastenenko, 1955-1956: 283, fig. 54.
Hippocampus guttulatus multiannularis: Albuquerque, 1956: 540, fig. 248A-B.
Hippocampus guttulatus microstephanus: Banarescu, 1964: 600, fig. 257 Svetovidov, 1964: 195, fig. 55.

caballito de mar [Es]
caballito de mar [Es]
seahorse [En]
cheval marin [Fr]
hippocampe mouchete [Fr]
sea-horse [En]
Seepferchen [De]
sohes [From]
zeepaardje [Ne]

Albuquerque, R. M. 1954-1956. Peixes de Portugal and ilhas adjacentes. Chavas para a sua determinção. Port. Acta biol., Ser. B, 5: xvi + 1167 pp., 445 fig.

Ancona, U. d '. 1933c. Gadidae, Berycoidei, Lampridae. In: Eggs, larvae and juvenile stages of Teleostei. Fauna Flora Golfo Napoli, 38: 178-255, 280-306, fig. 167-226, 240-244, pl. XII-XV, XVII-XVIII.

Banarescu, P. 1964. Pisces. Osteichthyes. Fauna Repub. pop. rom., Bucuresti, 13: 1-962, 402 fig.

Bini, G. 1967-1972. Fish Atlas of the Italian Coasts. Submerged World, Milan, 9 vol: I, 1967, Leptocardi, Ciclostomi, Selaci, 206 pp., 66 fig. + 64 col. fig. II, 1971, Osteitti (Acipenseriformi, Clupeiformi, Mictofiformi, Anguilliformi), 300 pp., 73 col. fig. III, 1970, Notacantiformi. . . Zeiformi, 229 pp., 34 fig. + 63 col. fig. IV, 1968, Perciforms (Mugiloidei, Percoidei), 163 pp., 34 fig. + 49 col. fig. V, 1968, Perciformi (Percoidei), 175 pp., 22 fig. + 56 col. fig. VI, 1968, Perciforms (Trichiuroidei.. Blennioidei), 177 pp., 48 fig + 57 col. fig. VII, 1969, Perciforms (Ofidioidei... Dactilopteroidei), 196 pp., 57 fig. + 59 col. fig. VIII, 1968, Pleuronettiformi, Echeniformi, Gobioesociformi, Tetraodontiformi, Lofiformi, 164 pp., 34 + 63 fig. IX, 1972, Introduction. General part. Updates. Indices. 176 p.

Brunelli, G. 1922. On the development of the seahorse (Hippocampus guttulatus Cuv.). Mem. R. Com. Thalassogr. ital, 91: 1-5, 2 pl.

Canestrini, G. 1871-1872. Fishes of Italy. Part I, 1871, Freshwater fishes: 436, 2 fig., Part II, 1872, Marine fishes: pp. 37-208. In: E. Cornalia, 1870-1874, Fauna d'Italia, Milan, 3: pp. 1-208.

Caporiacco, L. of 1948. The Italian Syngnathidae. Boll Fishing Piscic. Idrobiol. Rome (n.s.), 3 (1): 71-95.

Carus, J. V. 1893. Vertebrata. 1. class. Pisces: pp. 498-711, In: Prodromus faunae Mediterraneae sive Descriptio Animalium Maris Mediterranei incolarum quam comparata silva rerum quatenus innotuit adiectis locis et nominibus vulgaribus. . . Stuttgart, 1889-1893, 2: ix + 854 pp.

Cuvier, G. 1829. The règne animal distribué d'après are organization, pour serve de base à l'histoire naturelle des animaux et d'introduction à l'atomie comparée. Nouvelle édition, Paris, 2: pp. 122-406 [March 1829].

Day, F. 1880-1884. The Fishes of Great Britain and Ireland. London-Edinburgh, 2 vol., Cxii + 336 pp., 5 +7 fig., 92 pl. and 388 pp., 87 pl. 1880: 1 (1): pp. 1-64, pl. I-XXVII 1881: 1 (2) (3): pp. 65-240, pl. XXVIII-LXVIII 1882: 1 (4): pp. 241-336, pl. LXIX-XCII 2 (5): pp. 1-96, pl. XCIII-CXVI 1883: 2 (6): pp. 97-176, pl. CXVII-CXXXII 2 (7): pp. 177-272, pl. CXXXIII-CXLVIII 1884: 2 (8): pp. 273-368, pl. CXLIX-CLXXIX.

Duncker, G. Ladiges, W. 1960. Die Fische der Nordmark. Abh. naturw. Ver., Hamburg, N.F., 3, suppl .: pp. 1-432, 145 fig., 1 map.

Fowler, H. W. 1936. The Marine Fishes of West Africa, based on the collection of the American Museum Congo Expedition 1909-1915. Bull. am. Mus. nat. Hist., 70 (1), Jan. 21, 1936: pp. vii + 1-606, fig. 1-275 (2), Nov. 18, 1936: pp. 607-1493, fig. 276-567.

Ginsburg, I. 1937. Review of the seahorses (Hippocampus) found on the coasts of the American continents and of Europe. Proc. U.S. natn. Mus., 83: 497-594.

Jenkins, J. T. 1936. The fishes of the British Isles both fresh water and salt. Ed. 2. London and New York, viii + 408 pp., 21 fig., 143 pl.

Leach, W. E. 1814-1817. Zoological miscellany being descriptions of new or interesting animals. 3 vol. London 1814-1817.1, 1814: 144 pp., 60 col. pl. 2, 1815: 154 pp. + 4 ff. n. num., 120 col. pl. 3, 1817: vi + 151 pp., 149 col. pl.

Lowe, R. T. 1843-1860. A history of the Fishes of Madeira, with original figures from nature of all species by the Hon. C. E. C. Norton and M. Young. London: 196 pp., 27 + 1 pl. Part I, July 1843: pp. i-xv i + 1-20, 1 pl. plain + col. pl. IIV Part 2, Sept. 1843: pp. 21-52, pl. V-VIII Part 3, Nov. 1843: pp. 53-84, pl. IX-XII Part 4, Janv. 1844: pp. 85-116, pl. XIII-XVII Part 5, Oct. 1860: pp. 117-196.

Lozano y Rey, L. 1947. Peces Ganoideos y Fisostomos, Mems R. Acad. Cienc. exact. fis. nat. Madr., Ser .: Cienc. Nat., 11: xv + 839 p., 190 fig., 20 pl.

Moreau, E. 1881-1891. Histoire naturelle des poissons de la France, Paris, I, 1881: pp. I-VII + 1-480, fig. 1-82 II, 1881: pp. 1-572, fig. 83-145 III, 1881: pp. 1-697, fig. 146-220 Suppl., 1891: pp. 1-144, fig. 221-227.

Poljakov, G. D. Filipi, N. D. Basho, K. 1958. Peshgit and Shgiperise. [Fish of Albania], Tirane, 286 pp.

Poll, M. 1947. Poissons marins in Faune de Belgique. Brussels, 452 pp., 267 fig., 2 pl., 2 maps n. num. (inset).

Rauther, M. 1925. Die Syngnathiden des Golfes von Neapel. Publ. Station zool. Naples, 36: 365 p., 62 fig., 24 pl.

Risso, A. 1826. Natural history of the main productions of southern Europe and particulars of cells of the Nice and Alpes maritimes environments. Paris et Strasbourg, vol. III, XVI + 486 pp., 16 pl.

Schinz, H. R. 1821-1825, ed. Das Thierreich eingetheilt nach dem Bau der Thiere als Grundlage ihrer Naturgeschichte und der vergleichenden Anatomie, von dem Herrn Ritter von Cuvier, aus dem Französischen frei übersetzt und mit vielen Zusätzen versehen. Stuttgart und Tubingen, 4 vol., Fische, 2, 1822: 189-553.

Slastenenko, E. P. 1955-1956. Karadeniz havzasi baliklari (The Fishes of the Black Sea Basin). Istanbul: 711 p., 142fig.

Soljan, T. 1948. Fauna i flora jadrana. 1. Ribe Inst. Oceanogr. Ribarst. Yugoslavia. Zagreb, Hrvatske, 437 pp., 1350 fig.

Svetovidov, A. N. 1964. Rîbî Chernogo Morya. [The fishes of the Black Sea]. Opred Faune SSSR, 86: pp. 1-552, fig. 1-191 (in Russian).

Tortonese, E. 1970e. Osteichthyes (Bone Fish), Part One. Fauna Ital., 10, Calderini, Bologna, 565 pp., 198 fig.

Wheeler, A. 1969. The Fishes of the British Isles and North-West Europe. Macmillan, London, Melbourne and Toronto: pp. i-xvii + 1-163, 5 + 177 fig., 392 fig. (princ. sp.), 92 n. num. fig., 16 pl., maps.

Hippocampus ramulosus map
Hippocampus ramulosus 2

You can continue searching for Hippocampus ramulosus on one of these Web sites:


Results for Seahorse translation from Italian to Latin

From professional translators, enterprises, web pages and freely available translation repositories.

Italian

Latin

Italian

Latin

Last Update: 2013-08-03
Usage Frequency: 2
Quality:
Reference: Wikipedia

Italian

Latin

Last Update: 2013-10-16
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Wikipedia

Italian

Latin

Last Update: 2014-06-21
Usage Frequency: 3
Quality:
Reference: Wikipedia

Italian

Latin

Last Update: 2013-10-27
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Wikipedia

Italian

Latin

Last Update: 2014-11-15
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: IATE

Italian

Latin

Last Update: 2014-11-14
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: IATE

Italian

Latin

Optimatium novi principes

Last Update: 2021-03-29
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous

Italian

Latin

Last Update: 2020-10-13
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous

Italian

Latin

optimatium novi principes

Last Update: 2020-05-27
Usage Frequency: 2
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous

Italian

Latin

Vallum Antonini finis erat Britannie

Last Update: 2020-03-15
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous

Italian

Latin

Last Update: 2014-11-15
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: IATE

Italian

Latin

Last Update: 2014-11-15
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: IATE

Italian

Latin

Last Update: 2014-11-15
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: IATE

Italian

Latin

Sphyraena sphyraena (Linnaeus)

Last Update: 2014-11-14
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: IATE

Italian

Latin

Last Update: 2014-11-14
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: IATE

Italian

Latin

Last Update: 2014-11-14
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: IATE

Italian

Latin

Last Update: 2014-11-14
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: IATE

Italian

Latin

Last Update: 2014-11-14
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: IATE

Italian

Latin

Last Update: 2014-11-14
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: IATE

Italian

Latin

Last Update: 2014-11-14
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: IATE

Get a better translation with 4,401,923,520 human contributions

Users are now asking for help:

MyMemory is the world's largest Translation Memory. It has been created collecting TMs from the European Union and United Nations, and aligning the best domain-specific multilingual websites.

We're part of Translated, so if you ever need professional translation services, then go checkout our main site


Video: Pygmy Seahorse - Hippocampus Bargibanti 4K