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Information About Elaeagnus

Information About Elaeagnus


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Elaeagnus Plant Care – How To Grow Elaeagnus Limelight Plants

By Amy Grant

One variety of Oleaster primarily grown as a garden ornamental is the Elaeagnus ‘Limelight.’ It is an extremely resilient plant able to tolerate a variety of conditions, working great as a windbreak. For more information on how to grow Elaeagnus, click here.

Russian Olive Information: How To Grow An Elaeagnus Shrub

By Jackie Carroll

Elaeagnus Russian olives look great all year round, but are appreciated most in summer when the blossoms fill the air with a sweet, intense fragrance. This article contains information and care requirements for this lovely shrub.


Goes well with

Abelia × grandiflora

Lavandula angustifolia Hidcote

Crambe cordifolia

Hello, There are a couple of things that spring to mind (including this Elaeagnus) - here are some of the best. Aucuba http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.aucuba/sort.0/ Viburnum tinus http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.tinus/sort.0/ Choisya ternata http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/choisya-ternata/classid.825/

Hi the new hedge in my garden planted in December looks healthy but the new growth tips are beige brown almost like the co!our of dying off but the plants look healthy otherwise and no leaf drop. Is this the natural colour of the new growth please

Hello, Yes, no need to worry as the new foliage does look distinctly odd. In a few weeks time however it will start to resemble the more mature foliage.

How close to a boundary wall can it be planted? Would the wall side of the trench need any permeable root barrier? If planted in troughs1-2 metres long, more than 0.5 metre deep and 45cm wide (with attention to watering and feeding) would they make a good screen to hide lights and buildings beyond or would a 60cm wide trough be much likelier to achieve that? How many plants per metre if in ground? How many plants per metre if in troughs?

Hello, The general rule of thumb when planting near a structure is to never plant closer than the plants eventual height. This of course is a rule that is broken all the time, but it is hard to be too specific about exactly how far away a particular plant should be planted, as the root spread will ultimately be determined not just by the plant, but by other factors including soil type and the available water and nutrients. I am not really sure what height you want yours to grow, but if you want them to get big (they can grow up to 4m in height), then ideally they should be planted in the ground. As for the planting distance from one another, it depends on the type of effect you are trying to create, but if you want a nice, dense hedge, then I would space them at 45cm intervals.

Clay loving evergreen plant for covering a wall Sir, I need to hide an ugly brick wall. I would prefer to have all year cover, meaning evergreen, and not over 6` or so tall, and able to thrive in my clay rich soil. I thought of a blue lilac but am not sure if the roots could cope. A variety of plants might look nice and would breakup the monotony of the wall, but your advice would be much appreciated. Sincerely, Dorothy.

Hello Dorothy, There are several plants you could consider, including the Ceanothus if your soil is not too heavy. Alternatively any of the following would work well Aucuba http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.aucuba/ Elaeagnus x ebbingei http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/elaeagnus-%C3%97-ebbingei-/classid.3772/ Garrya http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/garrya-elliptica-james-roof/classid.3880/ Pyracantha http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.pyracantha/ I hope this gives you a few ideas. Helen Plant Doctor

Hedging and Osmanthus plants Dear Crocus, I am looking for two Osmanthus burkwoodii plants but notice on your website that you only offer them for sale in 2 litre size. Do you have any larger Osmanthus burkwoodii plants? I am also looking for suggestions on which plants would make a good hedge. I am looking for something hardy, able to stand the frost, evergreen, not poisonous to horses and if possible, not just green possibly red / purple or variegated, any thoughts? Also, as these plants are grown in Surrey, will they be suitable to grow in the Scottish Borders? Many thanks, Jane

Hello Jane, I'm afraid we have all the plants we sell displayed on our website so we do not sell larger sizes of the Osmanthus. As for the hedging, if you click on the link below it will take you to our full range of hedging plants. Unfortunately we do not have anything that meets all your criteria, but if you click on the smaller images it will give you a lot more information on hardiness levels (fully hardy means they can cope with the weather in Scotland) as well as leaf colour etc. Unfortunately though I do not have a list of plants which are not poisonous to horses, but your local vet may be able to help you with this. http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/hedging/plcid.30/ Best regards, Helen Plant Doctor

Screening in pots Hi there I'm looking for screening ideas. I'm having a raised deck built and I would like some privacy from the neighbours, can any of the hedges be grown in troughs?

Hello There, Many of the hedging plants can be grown in really large pots, as long as you make sure the plants are kept really well fed and watered. The following are some of the best options. Photinia, Elaeagnus, Prunus laurocerassus, Pyracantha and Phyllostachys I hope this helps. Helen Plant Doctor

What tough plants can I grow in big pots? I am looking for plants to fill up some outdoor planters facing a carpark. I want something tough please - can you give me 2 to 3 options?

There are several plants that will be suitable for growing in your containers. Below I have listed plants that are quite low maintenance and tough - just on the links below to access my suggestions:- Elaeagnus http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.elaeagnus/?s=elaeagnus Aucuba http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.aucuba/?s=aucuba Euonymus http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/euonymus-fortunei-emerald-gaiety/classid.3820/ Fatsia japonica http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/shrubs/fatsia-japonica-/classid.3840/ Buxus http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.buxus/?s=buxus Skimmia http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/_/search.skimmia/?s=skimmia

Which plants are Deer proof? I want a list of Deer proof plants please. It`s either a change in habitat or environment, but I get total devastation now and in the last two years they come up the drive.

Deer can be a real problem and deer proof plants are usually thorny, poisonous or simply taste awful, but it is hard to give a definitive list as you might get the odd deer with unusual tastes which might like the bitter taste! Below is a list of good plants that generally are quite successful though. Cornus varieties, Rhus, Sophora, Solanum, Berberis, Rosemary, Buxus, Cotoneaster, Ilex, Pyracantha, Garrya, Juniperus, Nandina, Elaeagnus, Aralia, Aucuba, Cortaderia, Yucca, Santolina, Hypericum, Myrtle, Vinca, Achillea, Digitalis, Echinacea and Dryopteris. Finally, fencing is one method to protect garden crops from deer. Since deer jump, you need an 8-foot fence for best results or stout chicken-wire fencing securely around smaller garden plots. Alternatively, fence the area with a thorny shrub, preferably something that will grow to at least 6 feet. Deer eat roses and some thorns but hawthorn, boxwood and holly will exclude them. Deer are also deterred by dogs, hanging aluminum foil, mirrors, wood that hits objects in the wind and other noise-makers. Some old-fashioned repellents are human hair and blood and bonemeal. Hanging bars of fragrant deodorant soap from branches may work. Other well-known deer repellents are mothballs or moth flakes spread on the ground or put in mesh bags for hanging in a tree. Unfortunately though, no repellent is 100 percent effective, especially if the deer population is high and deer are starving.

What can I plant in a pot? I am having problems with hooligans throwing stones at my patio windows. Can you suggest a small tree or shrub that will grow to around 2 - 2.5m high that can be placed in a large pot in front of the windows to help deter them?

There are a couple of plants that should form a good evergreen screen - here are some of the best. You can click on the link below each plant name to find out more about that particular one. Bamboo http://www.crocus.co.uk/findplant/results/?ParentCategoryID=301&ValueID=&ValueID=&x=38&y=8 Choisya ?? dewitteana 'Aztec Pearl' http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/shrubs/choisya-%C3%97-dewitteana-aztec-pearl/classid.823/ Viburnum tinus http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/shrubs/viburnum-tinus-/classid.4482/Elaeagnus http://www.crocus.co.uk/search/results/?q=elaeagnus

What can I plant that the deers won't eat? What types of plants do deer not like? If you could help me out I could greatly appreciate it.

Deer can be a real problem and deer proof plants are usually thorny, poisonous or simply taste awful. It is hard to give a definitive list as you might get the odd deer with unusual taste which might like a bitter taste, but the following is a list of plants that generally are quite successful. Cornus varieties, Rhus, Sophora, Solanum, Berberis, Rosemary, Buxus, Cotoneaster, Ilex, Pyracantha, Garrya, Juniperus, Nandina, Eleagnus, Aralia, Aucuba, Cortaderia, Yucca, Santolina, Hypericum, Myrtle, Vinca, Achillea, Digitalis, Echinacea and Dryopteris. Finally fencing is one method to protect garden crops from deer. Since deer jump, you need an 8-foot fence for best results or stout chicken-wire fencing securely around smaller garden plots. Alternatively, fence the area with a thorny shrub, preferably something that will grow to at least 6 feet. Deer do eat roses and some other thorns but hawthorn, boxwood and holly tend to keep them out. Deer are also deterred by dogs, hanging aluminum foil, mirrors, wood that hits objects in the wind and other noise-makers. Some old-fashioned repellents are human hair and blood and bonemeal. Hanging bars of fragrant deodorant soap from branches may work. Other well-known deer repellents are mothballs or moth flakes spread on the ground or put in mesh bags for hanging in a tree. Unfortunately though, no repellent is 100 percent effective, especially if the deer population is high and deer are starving.


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