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Information About Squawroot Flower

Information About Squawroot Flower


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Squawroot Plant Info: What Is Squawroot Flower

By Liz Baessler

Squawroot is a strange and fascinating little plant that looks like a pinecone, produces no chlorophyll of its own, and lives mostly underground as a parasite on the roots of oak trees. Learn more in this article.


Caulophyllum Growing and Care Guide

Common Names: Blue Cohosh, Papoose Root, Squaw Root.
Life Cycle: Hardy perennial
Height: 18 to 36 inches (45 to 90 cm).
Native: Northern America, East Asia.
Growing Region: Zones 4 to 7.
Flowers: Late spring.
Flower Details: Inconspicuous.
Fruit: Blue.
Foliage: Blue-green to green. Lobed. Compound.
Sow Outside: Grow from roots.
Roots: 1 inch (2.5 cm) Start of autumn. Spacing 12 to 18 inches (30 to 45 cm).
Sow Inside: No
Requirements: Partial or full shade. Deep soil, wood like soil, moist soil. pH 4.5 to 6.5. Winter mulch. Water to keep soil moist at all times. Supply a leaf mulch to maintain moisture. Once established do not disturb. Propagate: by dividing Caulophyllum in the spring or at the start of autumn. Or take rhizome cuttings.
Miscellaneous: Often used for alternative medical use, especially with childbirth and menstrual issues. The plant is poisonous, and should especially be avoided by pregnant women.


Watering your Zantedeschia

Watering outdoor zantedeschia

You can grow your Zantedeschia outdoors provided you observe a period of dormancy of at least 2 months within the year without watering a single drop.

  • After the blooming, reduce the watering until the leaves turn yellow.
  • When the leaves have withered, stop watering altogether.
  • Slowly start watering again at least 2 months later.

Water sparingly at the beginning and then more regularly once flowers have appeared, until the end of the blooming season.

Arum grows very well adjoining a body of water, which indicates how much it needs water.

Take note, though, that the term used for this plant is semi-aquatic, because it does need a water-free period of at least 2 months, generally during summer.

Watering indoor Zantedeschia

You can grow your Zantedeschia indoors, in pots, but again you must respect a period of dormancy of at least 2 months within the year without watering a single drop.

  • After the blooming, reduce the watering until the leaves turn yellow.
  • When the leaves have withered, stop watering altogether.
  • Slowly start watering again at least 2 months later.


Watering Dracaena massangeana

All year long, mist water on the leaves, preferably soft water.

Watering in spring and summer

This is usually the time of the year when the dracaena massangeana grows most.
Water regularly while letting the soil mix dry in the surface before watering again.

Watering must be regular but limited, in order to not suffocate the plant’s roots.
You might say that watering every 4 or 5 days is largely sufficient.

More or less every two weeks, you can offer it some liquid fertilizer, taking great care to moisten the soil mix beforehand.

Watering in fall and then in winter

Start reducing the watering because the plant water needs begin to decrease.
Only when the soil is dry down to the first inch or so (a couple centimeters), water to moisten the entire soil mix clump again.

Again, one might contend that watering one or 2 times a month should suffice.
But this also depends on where your dracaena is placed: if it is in full sun, its needs will surely be higher.

  • This colder season is also when to stop adding fertilizer, from October all the way to March and April.


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